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The Checkup for June 17: Marble Valley inmate tests positive for COVID-19

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With this regular feature, the Banner runs down breaking local and regional developments in the coronavirus crisis.

The numbers

According to the Vermont Department of Health, there have been a total of 1,130 cases of COVID-19 reported in Vermont. This number is one less than Tuesday. The department did not explain the discrepancy.

Bennington County's cumulative total remains at 67.

No Vermonters have died of the disease since May 28, leaving the total number of deaths at 55.

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So far, 53,663 tests have been administered.

The health department reported that 701 people were being monitored as of Sunday, an increase of 125 since Tuesday, and 1,059 have completed monitoring.

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One more person has recovered from COVID-19 since Tuesday, bringing the cumulative total to 915.

Marble Valley inmate tests positive

Human Service Secretary Mike Smith said an inmate at the Marble Valley Regional Correctional Facility in Rutland has tested positive for the virus that causes COVID-19 and he has shown symptoms of the disease.

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The inmate had recently been brought to the facility after being returned to Vermont from Florida. The inmate is being kept separate from other inmates, and the staff who brought him back to the state are being tested.

Earlier during the course of the pandemic, more than 40 inmates at one of Vermont's six prisons tested positive for the virus, but the cases were contained. Last week the Department of Corrections said it had completed testing of all inmates and staff and found the system free of COVID-19.

Smith said Marble Valley is now considered a COVID-positive facility and decisions will be made about what additional measures will be needed to ensure the virus doesn't spread.

"The greatest danger right now at the correctional facilities is from the outside, not from the inside,'' Smith said. "That is why the quarantine protocols are in place."


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