Celebrate the micro-season of abundance with adaptable focaccia

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Are you a "I love fall so much I'm already wearing a scarf" person or a "I can't stand that summer is ending so I'm shivering in my bathing suit" person? I love both seasons, but my favorite is what's happening right now, the micro-season that bridges the gap between lemonade and pumpkin spice.

I appreciate that it's still nice enough to eat outside, but more importantly, the farmers market/farm stand selection is insane. Want some summery tomatoes and zucchini with your butternut squash and early apples? For not very long, you can have it all without needing to freeze anything. (This is also a very good time for "seconds" — if you can find a local farmer with lots of imperfect tomatoes, it's time to make and freeze gallons of sauce.)

A perfect example: Jaeshke's Orchard in Adams has peaches, delicata squash and potatoes right now. I stopped by over Labor Day weekend to grab some peaches for an easy, but impressive, focaccia that celebrates the micro-season — it's made with store-bought pizza dough and features fresh rosemary (currently thriving in my garden), thin-sliced fresh local peaches and torn prosciutto. It's the kind of thing that is at its best this time of year and this time of year alone. So go to the market! Go to the nearest farm stand! Carpe diem!

PEACH, PROSCIUTTO AND ROSEMARY FOCACCIA

INGREDIENTS:

1 pizza dough, room temperature

2 fresh ripe peaches

1 to 2 sprigs fresh rosemary

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4 to 5 slices prosciutto

Goat cheese (optional)

Sea salt

A lot of olive oil

DIRECTIONS:

If you have two small sheet pans, divide dough into two pieces. (If you have one standard sheet pan, you're just going to make one big focaccia.) Generously oil your pans, then place dough into each one. Stretch gently with your fingers until you feel some resistance — your goal is to get the dough all the way to the edges of the pan, but you won't be able to do that right away.

Once dough is semi-stretched, cover tightly and let sit 45 minutes to one hour, then return to your stretching, taking your fingers and gently pulling dough until it easily stretches to the edges of the pan. If it's not doing this, you need more time — cover, wait 15 minutes, and try again.

Preheat oven to 500 degrees. Remove covers and drizzle a bit more oil over top of dough. Tear rosemary off its stem and scatter on dough, then tear prosciutto and do the same. Thinly slice peaches and place on dough. (I ate about half a peach while doing this so 1 to 1 1/2 peaches should be good!) Add a pinch of sea salt and crumbled goat cheese if you are using it. After oven is good and hot, cook focaccia 15 to 20 minutes, then remove from pan and let rest a minute before serving.


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