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Russian forces shelled a city close to Europe’s biggest nuclear power plant Thursday, reinforcing the U.N. nuclear chief’s fears that the situation around the facility is “grave and dangerous.” Dnipropetrovsk’s regional governor says Russia fired 60 rockets at Nikopol, across the Dnieper River from the Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant. Russian troops seized the plant early in the war. Some 50 residential buildings were damaged in the city. Rafael Grossi, head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, said earlier this week that the situation is becoming more perilous at the Zaporizhzhia plant. Ukrainian authorities say shelling of a town in the eastern Donetsk region left at least eight people dead. And the mayor of the separatist-held city of Donetsk says six were killed there.

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Some 1,000 Palestinians are at risk of expulsion from an arid region of the occupied West Bank that the Israeli military has designated as a live-fire training zone. Israel’s Supreme Court upheld their expulsion in May after a two-decade legal battle. Most residents have remained in place since the ruling, even as Israeli security forces periodically roll in to demolish structures. But they could be forced out at any time, and rights groups fear Israel will do it gradually to evade international scrutiny. Israel captured the West Bank in the 1967 Mideast war and the Palestinians want it to be the main part of their future state.

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Asian shares are mostly higher as investors welcome encouraging economic data and quarterly earnings reports from big companies. Benchmarks rose Thursday across the region, including Japan, China, Australia and South Korea. The gains followed a strong rally on Wall Street. Jitters eased over the visit of U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to Taiwan after she left for South Korea and then later Japan, firm U.S. allies for decades. But analysts said some geopolitical risks remain, with China conducting military exercises near the self-ruled island that it claims as its own territory. Investors are also watching U.S. nonfarm payrolls for indications on hiring.

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Michigan Rep. Peter Meijer, who witnessed the Capitol riot days after taking office in 2021 and then cast one of the 10 Republican votes to impeach Donald Trump over the attack, has lost his reelection bid. Meijer was defeated in a primary Tuesday by Trump-endorsed John Gibbs, a businessman and missionary who served in the Trump administration. Two Republicans in Washington state who incurred Trump’s wrath by voting for impeachment also went before voters. Races involving Reps. Jaime Herrera Beutler and Dan Newhouse were too early to call by Wednesday morning. Trump vowed revenge against the 10 who crossed party lines on the impeachment vote, and he endorsed party challengers to them in the midterm elections.

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U.S. officials have said taking out a terrorist threat in Afghanistan with no American troops on the ground would be difficult but not impossible. Last weekend, the U.S. did just that, killing al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri with a CIA drone strike. Other high-profile airstrikes in the past have inadvertently killed innocent civilians. To minimize that possibility, officials may have used the highly secretive Hellfire R9X with its half-dozen rotating blades. A former intelligence analyst, American Enterprise Institute senior fellow Klon Kitchen, says if the Hellfire R9X was used, it suggests the U.S. sought to limit the likelihood of collateral death and destruction.

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In the shadow of a thousand-dollar campaign billboard, one of many across Kenya’s capital, street vendors struggle to make even 200 shillings ($1.68) a day and often pocket none. Kenya’s Aug. 9 election is ripping open the scars of inequality and corruption as East Africa’s economic hub chooses a successor to President Uhuru Kenyatta. The Nairobi vendors can hardly grasp the enormous amounts of money spent on next week’s election, one of the most expensive in Africa. Hardly anyone can. In Kenya, candidates aren’t required to publicly account for campaign donations or spending. And corruption is widespread.

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U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has arrived in Taiwan. She is the highest-ranking American official in 25 years to visit the self-ruled island claimed by China, which quickly announced that it would conduct military maneuvers in retaliation for her presence. Pelosi arrived aboard a U.S. Air Force passenger jet and was greeted on the tarmac at Taipei’s international airport by Taiwan’s foreign minister and other Taiwanese and American officials. She posed for photos before her motorcade whisked her unseen into the parking garage of her hotel. Her visit has ratcheted up tension between China and the United States.

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The seeds of the U.S. counterterrorism operation that killed al-Qaida's leader were planted over many months. Years of efforts by U.S. intelligence operatives under four presidents to track Ayman al-Zawahri paid dividends earlier this year, when they located him at a safe house in Kabul, Afghanistan. U.S. officials say they built a scale model of the house, knew al-Zawahri was partial to sitting on the home’s balcony and became familiar with his movements by constructing what they called “a pattern of life." Around sunrise Sunday in Kabul, two Hellfire missiles fired by a U.S. drone killed him.

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A psychiatrist says that the parents of a Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victim live with a complex form of post-traumatic stress disorder and a constant fear that followers of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones will kill them. Roy Lubit, a forensic psychiatrist hired by plaintiffs Neil Heslin and Scarlett Lewis to review the trauma they've faced, testified Monday at Jones’ defamation trial in Austin that the “overwhelming cause” of their ongoing trauma is Jones' claims that the 2012 massacre in which six educators and 20 students, including their son Jesse, were killed was a hoax or faked. The trial is to determine how much Jones owes the parents for defaming them. They are seeking at least $150 million.

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Recovery of some vulnerable species through restoration efforts has made comebacks more difficult for others in peril. Once-endangered animals, including the iconic bald eagle, sometimes jeopardize rarer species such as the great cormorant by eating them or outcompeting them for food and living space. Similar circumstances have turned up elsewhere, challenging wildlife experts who want all creatures to thrive in balanced, healthy environments. Conflicts have involved revived U.S. species such as gray seals, birds of prey and even turkeys. Wildlife managers around the country are working on creative solutions to the unanticipated consequences of species salvation.