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Abortion, guns, religion. A major change in the law in any one of these areas would have made for a fateful Supreme Court term. But in its first full term together, the court’s conservative majority ruled in all three and issued other significant decisions limiting the government’s regulatory powers. And that majority has signaled it has no plans to slow down. With former President Donald Trump's three appointees in their 50s, the six-justice conservative majority seems poised to keep control of the court for years to come, if not decades. Its remaining opinions issued, the court began its summer recess Thursday, and the justices will next return to the courtroom in October.

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The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a North Carolina case that could dramatically change the way elections for Congress and the presidency are conducted. The case could ultimately hand more power to state legislatures and block state courts from reviewing challenges to the procedures and results. The justices will consider whether state courts, finding violations of their state constitutions, can order changes to federal elections and the once-a-decade redrawing of congressional districts. The case, an appeal from North Carolina Republicans, challenges a state court ruling throwing out the congressional districts drawn by the state’s General Assembly that made GOP candidates likely victors in 10 of the state’s 14 congressional districts.

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President Joe Biden says he would support an exception to the Senate filibuster to protect access to abortion after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. The Democratic president said Thursday there should be an “exception to the filibuster for this action to deal with the Supreme Court decision.” Biden's remarks may cheer supporters who want to see him take more strident stances on the issue, but it's unlikely to change the outcome in Washington. At least two Democratic senators do not want to change the filibuster rule, closing off such an avenue to address abortion. Biden spoke from Madrid, where he was attending a NATO summit.

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A new poll shows about half of Americans say former President Donald Trump should be charged with a crime for his role in what happened on Jan. 6. The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll finds 48% of U.S. adults believe Trump should be held accountable for what happened during the deadly Capitol attack. The poll was conducted after the first five public hearings from the House committee investigating Jan. 6, 2021, and before Tuesday's surprise hearing with former Trump White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson. The explosive testimony proved to be the committee's most damning evidence yet to link the Republican former president to a federal crime.

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The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection has issued a subpoena to former White House counsel Pat Cipollone. His reported resistance to Donald Trump’s schemes to overturn his 2020 election defeat has made him a long-sought and potentially revelatory witness. Cipollone is said to have stridently and repeatedly warned the former president and his allies against their efforts to challenge the election. The subpoena issued Wednesday is the first action from the committee since the testimony of former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson. Her gripping account of what she saw and heard has raised new questions about whether Trump or some of his allies could face criminal liability.

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The House Jan. 6 committee has now heard dramatic testimony from former White House aides and others about Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election. It's also heard of his encouragement to supporters before they marched to the Capitol and violently broke in. But it’s still far from clear whether any of Trump’s actions were criminal, or whether he will be charged.  Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson provided explosive testimony to the committee that opened up new legal issues about Trump’s role in the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection — including testimony that he knew protesters were armed and he wanted to go to the Capitol with them.

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The latest testimony about the events surrounding the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has Donald Trump rebuffing his own security’s warnings about armed protesters in the crowd gathering for a rally near the White House. A former White House aide also tells the House committee investigating the attack that Trump desperately attempted to join his supporters as they marched to the Capitol. In her testimony Tuesday, Cassidy Hutchinson described an angry, defiant president who grabbed at the steering wheel of the presidential SUV when the Secret Service refused to allow him go to the Capitol. Trump has dismissed her as “a total phony.”

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Colorado Republicans have rejected two prominent election deniers in primaries Tuesday night. It's a setback for the movement to install backers of former President Donald Trump's election lies in positions with power over voting. Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters lost the Republican primary for secretary of state to Pam Anderson, a former clerk in suburban Denver. Peters was indicted for her role in a break-in of her county's election system. An ally, State Rep. Ron Hanks, lost his bid for the GOP Senate nomination. Hanks attended the Jan. 6 protests. He was beaten by businessman Joe O'Dea, a rare GOP backer of some abortion rights.

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Colorado Republicans have rejected an indicted county clerk as their nominee for secretary of state, choosing a former local official who ran on a platform of taking politics out of running elections. In spurning Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters, the bulk of Republican primary voters appeared to reject the conspiracy theories and false claims that have spread among conservatives since the November 2020 presidential election. Over the last year, Peters has appeared regularly with prominent allies of former President Donald Trump, who claims without evidence that the election was stolen from him.

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A former Trump White House aide has painted a portrait of a volatile commander-in-chief who lashed out at advisers as his grasp on power was extinguished. Though accounts of the former president’s temper are legion, Cassidy Hutchinson offered previously unknown details about the extent of Trump’s rage in his final weeks of office, his awareness that supporters had weapons with them and his ambivalence as rioters later laid siege to the Capitol. The testimony to the House Jan. 6 committee deepened questions about whether Trump himself could face criminal charges for his conduct and came as Trump weighs running for reelection in 2024.