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A new poll shows about half of Americans say former President Donald Trump should be charged with a crime for his role in what happened on Jan. 6. The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll finds 48% of U.S. adults believe Trump should be held accountable for what happened during the deadly Capitol attack. The poll was conducted after the first five public hearings from the House committee investigating Jan. 6, 2021, and before Tuesday's surprise hearing with former Trump White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson. The explosive testimony proved to be the committee's most damning evidence yet to link the Republican former president to a federal crime.

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The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection has issued a subpoena to former White House counsel Pat Cipollone. His reported resistance to Donald Trump’s schemes to overturn his 2020 election defeat has made him a long-sought and potentially revelatory witness. Cipollone is said to have stridently and repeatedly warned the former president and his allies against their efforts to challenge the election. The subpoena issued Wednesday is the first action from the committee since the testimony of former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson. Her gripping account of what she saw and heard has raised new questions about whether Trump or some of his allies could face criminal liability.

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The House Jan. 6 committee has now heard dramatic testimony from former White House aides and others about Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election. It's also heard of his encouragement to supporters before they marched to the Capitol and violently broke in. But it’s still far from clear whether any of Trump’s actions were criminal, or whether he will be charged.  Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson provided explosive testimony to the committee that opened up new legal issues about Trump’s role in the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection — including testimony that he knew protesters were armed and he wanted to go to the Capitol with them.

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The latest testimony about the events surrounding the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has Donald Trump rebuffing his own security’s warnings about armed protesters in the crowd gathering for a rally near the White House. A former White House aide also tells the House committee investigating the attack that Trump desperately attempted to join his supporters as they marched to the Capitol. In her testimony Tuesday, Cassidy Hutchinson described an angry, defiant president who grabbed at the steering wheel of the presidential SUV when the Secret Service refused to allow him go to the Capitol. Trump has dismissed her as “a total phony.”

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Colorado Republicans have rejected two prominent election deniers in primaries Tuesday night. It's a setback for the movement to install backers of former President Donald Trump's election lies in positions with power over voting. Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters lost the Republican primary for secretary of state to Pam Anderson, a former clerk in suburban Denver. Peters was indicted for her role in a break-in of her county's election system. An ally, State Rep. Ron Hanks, lost his bid for the GOP Senate nomination. Hanks attended the Jan. 6 protests. He was beaten by businessman Joe O'Dea, a rare GOP backer of some abortion rights.

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A former Trump White House aide has painted a portrait of a volatile commander-in-chief who lashed out at advisers as his grasp on power was extinguished. Though accounts of the former president’s temper are legion, Cassidy Hutchinson offered previously unknown details about the extent of Trump’s rage in his final weeks of office, his awareness that supporters had weapons with them and his ambivalence as rioters later laid siege to the Capitol. The testimony to the House Jan. 6 committee deepened questions about whether Trump himself could face criminal charges for his conduct and came as Trump weighs running for reelection in 2024.

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Two years after completing a White House summer internship, Cassidy Hutchinson was in the room where the president’s top aides debated how they could overturn his election loss. The former aide to chief of staff Mark Meadows testified Tuesday at a surprise hearing of the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection. Hutchinson disclosed new details about what Meadows and former President Donald Trump knew about possible violence at the Jan. 6 rally. She testified that she heard Trump demand that attendees not be screened, saying, “I don’t effing care that they have weapons. They’re not here to hurt me.”

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The House Jan. 6 committee held a surprise hearing Tuesday delivering alarming new testimony about Donald Trump’s actions that day. Witness Cassidy Hutchinson is a lesser-known former White House aide who had proximity to power as an adviser to the then-president and his chief of staff Mark Meadows. She rebuffed Trump’s team warnings against testifying and provided firsthand knowledge of what she saw and heard in the run-up to the insurrection. She described an angry and defiant Trump who ignored repeated warnings against summoning the mob to the Capitol on Jan. 6 and then refused to intervene to stop the violence as rioters laid siege.

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Many observers expected the Jan. 6 committee hearings would be nothing more than reruns, but they've proven much more. They've revealed a storyteller's eye, with focus and clarity, an understanding of how news is digested these days and strong character development. The Republican House leadership's decision to walk away from the examination into former President Donald Trump's effort to stay in office essentially allowed the committee to structure it the way it wanted. The committee has kept a tight grip on the message, and the myriad ways that it is delivered after the hearings are concluded each day.

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Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani is not the guy most politicians would summon to hold a news conference for them, not after his false assertions of election fraud. But one place where Giuliani is in high demand these days is on his son Andrew's long shot campaign to win the GOP nomination for governor of New York. Andrew Giuliani worked as an aide in the Trump White House and as a commentator on the conservative network Newsmax, but he has never held elected office. His father says that when he was mayor and his son a teenager, his son was helpful to him.