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A METRA commuter train passes through the Highland Park, Ill. train station, without making a stop, one day after a mass shooting in the suburban Chicago town Tuesday, July 5, 2022, in Highland Park, Ill. A shooter fired on an Independence Day parade from a rooftop spraying the crowd with gunshots initially mistaken for fireworks before hundreds of panicked revelers of all ages fled in terror. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

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More than 30,000 residents of Sydney and its surrounds have been told to evacuate or prepare to abandon their homes as Australia’s largest city faces more severe flooding. Days of torrential rain have caused dams to overflow and waterways to break their banks. The excess water means parts of the city of 5 million people are facing a fourth flooding emergency in 16 months. Emergency officials said Monday the current flooding is likely to be worse than the others and affect areas spared in the earlier floods. Some places received 3 feet of rain in the past 24 hours. Rain is forecast all week.

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Ukrainian authorities say Russian missile attacks on residential buildings in a coastal town near the port city of Odesa have killed at least 21 people, including an 11-year-old boy, his mother and a soccer coach. Video of the pre-dawn attack Friday showed the charred remains of buildings in the small town of Serhiivka. The Ukrainian president’s office said three X-22 missiles fired by Russian bombers struck an apartment building and a campsite. The assault came after Russian forces withdrew from a nearby Black Sea island on Thursday. Despite the withdrawal, Ukraine's military reported Friday that Russian warplanes bombed Snake Island.

The fireworks are still a few days away, but travel for the July Fourth weekend is off to a booming start. The Transportation Security Administration said Friday that it screened more people on Thursday than it did on the same day in 2019, before the pandemic. Travelers so far seem to be experiencing fewer delays and canceled flights than they did earlier this week. But it's still early. Leisure travel has bounced back this year, offsetting weakness in business travel and international flying. Still, the total number of people flying has not quite recovered fully to pre-pandemic levels.

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Social media users shared a range of false claims this week. Here are the facts: A 2019 amendment to a Kentucky abortion law was proposed as satire and not seriously considered. A Department of Defense statement issued after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade did not say the Pentagon would defy the ruling, nor did it say it would violate any state laws on the matter. Pallets of bricks pictured on a Washington, D.C., street were for ongoing construction, not to incite rioting. Research at a Tennessee laboratory studied neutron activity, not a portal to a parallel universe.

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If you're flying this holiday weekend, be prepared for crowded airports, full planes, and higher-than-normal chances that your flight will be delayed or even canceled. Airlines have stumbled badly over the last two holiday weekends, and the number of Americans flying over the July Fourth weekend is expected to set records for the pandemic era. Problems have been popping up already, with high numbers of cancellations this week, some of them caused by thunderstorms that snarled air traffic. Tracking service FlightAware says American Airlines canceled 8% of its flights on Tuesday and Wednesday, and United Airlines scrubbed 4% of its schedule on those same days.

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A measure of inflation that is closely tracked by the Federal Reserve jumped 6.3% in May from a year earlier, unchanged from its level in April. Thursday’s report from the Commerce Department provided the latest evidence that painfully high inflation is pressuring American households and inflicting particular harm on low-income families and people of color. The government’s report also said that consumer spending rose at a sluggish 0.2% rate from April to May. On a month-to-month basis, prices rose 0.6% from April to May, up from the 0.2% increase from March to April.

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Los Angeles and Mumbai, India, are the world’s only megacities of 10 million-plus people where large felines breed, hunt and maintain territory within urban boundaries. Long-term studies in both cities have examined how the big cats prowl through their urban jungles and how people can best live alongside them. Scientists in India recently fitted five leopards with tracking collars to understand how they use territory around Sanjay Gandhi National Park. In Los Angeles, research showing how harmful a fragmented habitat and risks of inbreeding would be for mountain lions fueled support for building a wildlife crossing bridge over a busy freeway.

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The Supreme Court's ruling allowing states to regulate abortion has set off a travel scramble in some parts of the U.S.,  as abortion providers redirect patients to states that still allow the procedure. A growing number of states are moving to mostly banning abortion. Clinics operators are moving, doctors are counseling crying patients, donations are pouring into nonprofits and one group is dispatching vans to administer abortion pills. Some cities _ like Kansas City and St. Louis _ also are drafting plans to help with the travel logistics. Groups are trying to help with everything from gas cards for travel to connecting patients with small aircraft pilots willing to transport them to a clinic in another state.

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Three people were killed and dozens others were injured Monday when an Amtrak passenger train traveling from Los Angeles to Chicago struck a dump truck and derailed in a remote, rural area of Missouri. A Missouri State Highway Patrol spokesman says two of the people who died were on the train and one was in the truck.  It was not immediately clear exactly how many people were hurt, the patrol said, but hospitals reported receiving more than 40 patients from the crash and were expecting more. Officials say Amtrak's Southwest Chief was carrying about 207 passengers and crew members when the collision happened near Mendon at a rural intersection on a gravel road with no lights or electronic controls. The Highway Patrol said seven cars derailed.