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The Supreme Court's ruling on carbon emission controls on power plants this past week has cast light on the world of federal regulation. The ruling is seen as a potential blow to the fight against global warming, and it may have broader implications, too. Federal regulations run through American life, touching on everything we consume, the air we breathe, the water we drink. Regulation has become the go-to way for presidents to make policy when they can’t get Congress to pass a law, as on climate change. Barack Obama and Donald Trump did it, and so does Joe Biden. But the court’s conservative majority said not so fast to Biden.

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Medication abortions were the preferred method for ending pregnancy in the U.S. even before the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. As more states seek abortion limits, demand is expected to grow. They involve using two prescription medicines days apart _ pills that can be taken at home or in a clinic. The drug mifepristone is taken first. It blocks the effects of the hormone progesterone, which is needed to sustain a pregnancy. Misoprostol is taken 24 to 48 hours later. It cause the womb to contract, expelling the pregnancy. Use of the pills has been increasing in recent years.

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Abortion, guns, religion. A major change in the law in any one of these areas would have made for a fateful Supreme Court term. But in its first full term together, the court’s conservative majority ruled in all three and issued other significant decisions limiting the government’s regulatory powers. And that majority has signaled it has no plans to slow down. With former President Donald Trump's three appointees in their 50s, the six-justice conservative majority seems poised to keep control of the court for years to come, if not decades. Its remaining opinions issued, the court began its summer recess Thursday, and the justices will next return to the courtroom in October.

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Abortion-rights and anti-abortion demonstrators gather outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, June 24, 2022. The Supreme Court has ended constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place nearly 50 years, a decision by its conservative majority to overturn the court's landmark abortion cases. Abortion, guns and religion _ a major change in the law in any one of these areas would have made for a fateful Supreme Court term. In its first full term together, the court's conservative majority ruled in all three and issued other significant decisions limiting the government's regulatory powers. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe, File)

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In this image provided by the Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts administers the Constitutional Oath to Ketanji Brown Jackson as her husband Patrick Jackson holds the Bible at the Supreme Court in Washington, Thursday, June 30, 2022. Abortion, guns and religion _ a major change in the law in any one of these areas would have made for a fateful Supreme Court term. In its first full term together, the court's conservative majority ruled in all three and issued other significant decisions limiting the government's regulatory powers. (Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States via AP)

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New York’s legislature has approved a sweeping overhaul of the state’s handgun licensing rules, seeking to preserve some limits after the Supreme Court said people have a right to carry a handgun for personal protection. Gov. Kathy Hochul signed the measure into law after it passed both chambers by wide margins. The law is almost sure to draw more legal challenges from gun-rights advocates who said the state is still putting too many restrictions on who can get a gun and where they can carry it. Backers said the new law will strike the right balance between complying with the Supreme Court’s ruling and trying to ensure that weapons stay out of the hands of criminals.

AP

Conference realignment in college sports has been going on since 1984, when the Supreme Court invalidated the NCAA’s national television contract for football. The conference juggling has gone through ebbs and flows through the years since, from small schools bumping up to bigger leagues to power programs switching to other major conferences. The latest move, UCLA and USC bolting the Pac-12 for the Big Ten, could be part of a tectonic shift. Not just because of the marquee-named schools involved, but because it happened at a time when the NCAA is looking to take a more decentralized approach to governing college athletics, handing more power to schools and conferences.

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Decades of anti-abortion laws have been created in some states, and many of them conflict with each other. Idaho has nearly three dozen anti-abortion laws dating back to 1973, and Attorney General Lawrence Wasden's office says he i giving them all a close look to see which might be enforceable now that the U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade. But it's not an easy question — in Arizona, leaders in the Republican Party disagree over whether an abortion law from 1901 should be enforced over a 2022 version. Grant Loebs is the president of the Idaho Prosecuting Attorneys Association. He says decision on whether to charge someone under an older abortion law will probably come down to individual prosecutors at first.

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U.S. climate envoy John Kerry says setbacks for President Joe Biden’s climate efforts at home have “slowed the pace” of some of the commitments from other countries to cut climate-wrecking fossil fuel pollution in diplomacy abroad. But Kerry insisted in an interview with The Associated Press that the U.S. can still achieve its own ambitious climate goals in time. Kerry spoke a day after a major Supreme Court ruling limited the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to regulate climate pollution from power plants.

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FILE - John F. Kerry, Special Presidential Envoy for Climate of the United States, gestures during a news conference at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, May 24, 2022. Kerry said Friday, July 1, that setbacks for President Joe Biden's climate efforts at home have “slowed the pace” of some of the commitments from other countries to cut climate-wrecking fossil fuels, but he insisted the U.S. would still achieve its own ambitious national climate goals in time. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, File)