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The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection has issued a subpoena to former White House counsel Pat Cipollone. His reported resistance to Donald Trump’s schemes to overturn his 2020 election defeat has made him a long-sought and potentially revelatory witness. Cipollone is said to have stridently and repeatedly warned the former president and his allies against their efforts to challenge the election. The subpoena issued Wednesday is the first action from the committee since the testimony of former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson. Her gripping account of what she saw and heard has raised new questions about whether Trump or some of his allies could face criminal liability.

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The House Jan. 6 committee has now heard dramatic testimony from former White House aides and others about Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election. It's also heard of his encouragement to supporters before they marched to the Capitol and violently broke in. But it’s still far from clear whether any of Trump’s actions were criminal, or whether he will be charged.  Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson provided explosive testimony to the committee that opened up new legal issues about Trump’s role in the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection — including testimony that he knew protesters were armed and he wanted to go to the Capitol with them.

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A U.S. House committee says Washington Commanders owner Dan Snyder conducted a “shadow investigation” that sought to discredit former employees making accusations of workplace sexual harassment. The committee released a memo ahead of a hearing Wednesday. The Committee on Oversight and Reform is investigating the Commanders’ workplace culture following accusations of pervasive sexual harassment by team executives of women employees. Snyder declined to testify at the hearing, but the committee plans to issue a subpoena to compel a deposition. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell told the committee that Snyder “has been held accountable."

Members of the House committee investigating the Capitol riot say they may subpoena former Vice President Mike Pence. And they are waiting to hear from Virginia “Ginni” Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, about her role in the illegal plot to overturn the 2020 election. In interviews on the Sunday news shows, committee members pledged to provide pertinent material to the Justice Department by the end of the month for its criminal investigation. Rep. Adam Schiff says the committee is "not taking anything off the table in terms of witnesses who have not yet testified.” He describes a Pence subpoena as “certainly a possibility.”

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The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol will hold the first in a series of hearings laying out its findings on Thursday night. The prime-time hearing is expected to offer a highly anticipated look at evidence the panel has been gathering for the last year. The nine-member panel hopes to grab the attention of the American public and remind people of the violence of the day in 2021. And they plan to use the more than 1,000 interviews to lay out evidence about people who played pivotal roles in the siege.

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A congressional committee’s hearings on the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection are coming up, and the public has been told to expect revelations. Over months, the panel has issued more than 100 subpoenas, done more than 1,000 interviews and probed more than 100,000 documents. All that to get to the bottom of the attack that day in 2021 by supporters of then-President Donald Trump. Yet it’s questionable how much attention the public will pay the hearings in the aftermath of the Texas school shooting and amid high inflation. Nevertheless, the House panel is making history about one of the most consequential episodes in American democracy.

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Former Trump White House official Peter Navarro has been indicted on charges that he refused to cooperate with a congressional investigation into the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. But the Justice Department spared two other advisers, including the ex-president’s chief of staff, Mark Meadows, from criminal prosecution.The department’s decision to not prosecute Meadows and Dan Scavino, another adviser to former President Donald Trump, was revealed in a letter sent Friday by a federal prosecutor to a lawyer for the House of Representatives. The move was reported hours after the indictment of Navarro and a subsequent, fiery court appearance in which he vowed to contest the contempt of Congress charges.

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The Justice Department has declined to charge former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows and another aide to former President Donald Trump, Dan Scavino, for contempt of Congress for their defiance of subpoenas in the Jan. 6 congressional investigation. That’s according to a person familiar with a letter sent by the Justice Department to a lawyer for the House of Representatives on Friday. The action came the same day as the Justice Department said a grand jury had indicted Peter Navarro, a trade adviser in the Trump White House, for his refusal to cooperate with the committee’s investigation. The New York Times first reported the decision not to prosecute Meadows and Scavino.

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Former Trump adviser Peter Navarro has revealed in a draft court filing he's been subpoenaed to appear before a grand jury this week as part of the Justice Department’s probe into the deadly U.S. Capitol insurrection. Navarro said Tuesday he was served by the FBI at his Washington, D.C., house last week. The subpoena is the first known instance of prosecutors seeking testimony from someone who worked in President Donald Trump's White House as they investigate the worst attack on the Capitol in two centuries. The Navarro subpoena could signal the Justice Department is widening its probe to examine the activities and records of people who worked directly for the Republican president.