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AP
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Israel’s ties to the Jewish American community are about to be put to the test, with Israel’s emerging far-right government on a collision course with Jews in the United States. Major Jewish American organizations that have traditionally been a bedrock of support for Israel have expressed alarm over the presumptive government’s far-right character. The vast majority of American Jews have liberal political views and lean toward the Democratic Party. Misgivings over the expected government led by conservative Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu could have a ripple effect in Washington and further widen what has become a partisan divide over support for Israel.

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Friction has been simmering within the global Anglican Communion for many years over its 42 provinces’ sharp differences on whether to recognize same-sex marriage and ordain LGBTQ clergy. This year, the divisions have widened, as conservative bishops – notably from Africa and Asia – have affirmed their opposition to LGBTQ inclusion. They are demanding “repentance” by the provinces with inclusive policies — such as the Episcopal Church in the United States. Caught in the middle of the fray is the archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, the top bishop of the Church of England and ceremonial leader of the Anglican Communion. He has acknowledged deep disagreement among the provinces and is urging them not to split apart.

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Friction has been simmering within the global Anglican Communion for many years over its 42 provinces’ sharp differences on whether to recognize same-sex marriage and ordain LGBTQ clergy. This year, the divisions have widened, as conservative bishops – notably from Africa and Asia – have affirmed their opposition to LGBTQ inclusion. They are demanding “repentance” by the provinces with inclusive policies — such as the Episcopal Church in the United States. Caught in the middle of the fray is the archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, the top bishop of the Church of England and ceremonial leader of the Anglican Communion. He has acknowledged deep disagreement among the provinces and is urging them not to split apart.

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FILE - Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, front row, centre right poses for a photo with bishops from around the world at the University of Kent, during the 15th Lambeth Conference, in Canterbury, England, Friday, July 29, 2022. Friction has been simmering within the global Anglican Communion for many years over its 42 provinces’ sharp differences on whether to recognize same-sex marriage and ordain LGBTQ clergy. In 2022, the divisions have widened, as conservative bishops – notably from Africa and Asia – affirmed their opposition to LGBTQ inclusion and demanded “repentance” by the more liberal provinces with inclusive policies. (Gareth Fuller/PA via AP, File)

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FILE - Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, center right and bishops from around the world gather at the University of Kent for a group photo during the 15th Lambeth Conference, in Canterbury, England, Friday, July 29, 2022. Friction has been simmering within the global Anglican Communion for many years over its 42 provinces’ sharp differences on whether to recognize same-sex marriage and ordain LGBTQ clergy. In 2022, the divisions have widened, as conservative bishops – notably from Africa and Asia – affirmed their opposition to LGBTQ inclusion and demanded “repentance” by the more liberal provinces with inclusive policies. (Gareth Fuller/PA via AP, File)

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FILE - The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, left, accompanied by Archbishop of Kenya Eliud Wabukala, center left, leaves after conducting a service at the All Saints Cathedral in Nairobi, Kenya Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013. Welby made the one-day visit to Kenya to meet with the Primates of the Anglican Communion on the eve of the second Global Anglican Future Conference (GAFCON) in Nairobi. In 2022, conservative bishops – notably from Africa and Asia – have affirmed their opposition to LGBTQ inclusion. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

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In churches, synagogues and mosques across the United States, religious teaching and texts are often cited in disapproving of LGBTQ people. As a result, many LGBTQ believers feel they have no choice but to leave. Many end up rejecting religion altogether; others find a place in faith communities that are welcoming. But increasingly, some LGBTQ religious people are  continuing to serve and worship even where they are officially considered in violation of divine law or are barred from leadership. In many cases, they're able to find a particular house of worship that that has attracted other LGBTQ people in similar circumstances.

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JQY Executive Director Rachael Fried, left, speaks, at the Jewish Queer Youth's annual community event for the festival of Sukkot on Oct. 13, 2022 in New York, accompanied by founder and Clinical Director Mordechai Levovitz. “A lot of people ask, why would somebody who is queer stay Orthodox? It’s like saying, there’s conflict in your family — why don’t you just leave?” Fried says. (Justin Haim via AP)

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Natalie Drew speaks at an OutPro event on "Creating an Inclusive Workplace" at the Grand Rapids Chamber of Commerce in Grand Rapids, Mich., on Oct. 11, 2022. Drew, a trans woman, is a member of a Christian Reformed Church congregation in Grand Rapids where she and her family feel welcomed. “You don’t have to give up your faith to be who you are,” she says. (Lynell Miller via AP)

AP
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Here and there, across the far-flung Muslim and Arab world, LGBTQ people see glimmers of progress — but those are rare exceptions. Many Muslim nations criminalize gay and lesbian sex -- including World Cup host Qatar. LGBTQ people routinely are rejected by their families, denounced by Islamic authorities, hounded by security forces, and limited to clandestine social lives. Appeals for change from LGBTQ-friendly nations are routinely dismissed as unwarranted outside interference. In some countries, apparent advances for LGBTQ people have been followed by setbacks. Lebanon and Turkey are prime examples