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Renewed allegations of racism at Buckingham Palace threatened to overshadow Prince William’s trip to the United States after campaigners said the palace needed to acknowledge that the latest incident was part of a wider problem. The controversy erupted Wednesday when a Black advocate for survivors of domestic abuse said a senior member of the royal household interrogated her about her origins during a reception at the palace for people working to end violence against women. Shortly after the Prince and Princess of Wales arrived in Boston for a three-day visit, a royal spokesman said racism had “no place in our society” and noted that the household member involved had resigned.

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The founder of the institute that examines diversity in sports is taking to Twitter to highlight weekly examples of racism in sports and elsewhere. Richard Lapchick is the founder of The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, which was launched in 2002 at Central Florida. Lapchick says he's doing so to raise awareness about "the frequency of these divisive and destructive events. TIDES annually produces report cards evaluating racial- and gender-hiring practices in professional sports leagues as well as college sports.

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The white gunman who massacred 10 Black people at a Buffalo supermarket has pleaded guilty to murder and hate-motivated terrorism charges. Payton Gendron’s plea means he’ll spend his life in prison without parole. The 19-year-old modified a legally purchased semiautomatic rifle into an assault weapon before targeting the Tops Friendly Market in May. He said in writings posted online that his goal was to terrify Black people and preserve white power. His own lawyer said Monday’s plea “represents a condemnation of the racist ideology that fueled his horrific actions.” Gendron previously pleaded not guilty to separate federal hate crime charges that could carry the death penalty.

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Republicans had placed their midterm hopes on a roster of Latina candidates to make gains with Latino voters, but the verdict was mixed. While Republican House candidates made modest inroads among Latino voters in 2022 compared with 2018, several GOP Latina candidates in high-profile races lost. Overall, the House will see a net gain of at least eight Latino members, with seven of them being Democrats. That will bring the total Latino representation in Congress to 11%, lower than the 19% in the total U.S. population.

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Election deniers who backed Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election failed in some of their highest-profile races. Conspiracy theorists were crushed in Michigan and Pennsylvania, and Trump's handpicked candidate for Wisconsin governor lost, meaning the GOP won't be able to change the way elections are administered in that pivotal swing state. There are two key states where the races for top posts are too close to call — Arizona and Nevada. But democracy advocates were cheered at the initial round of major losses. Says one GOP pollster: “Trying to overturn an election is not wildly popular with the American people."

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The Supreme Court appears likely to leave in place most of a federal law that gives preference to Native American families in foster care and adoption proceedings of Native children. The justices heard more than three hours of arguments in a broad challenge to the Indian Child Welfare Act, enacted in 1978 to address concerns that Native children were being separated from their families and, too frequently, placed in non-Native Homes. It has long been championed by tribal leaders as a means of preserving their families, traditions and cultures. But white families seeking to adopt Native children are among the challengers who say the law is impermissibly based on race, and also prevents states from considering those children’s best interests.

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Concerns over Twitter's future are weighing on many people who have come to rely on the relatively small but mighty platform that has become a digital public square of sorts for influencers, policy makers, journalists and other thought leaders. Some fear Twitter will turn into a haven for racist and toxic speech under the control of Elon Musk, a serial provocateur who's indicated he could loosen content rules. The debate over whether to stay or leave the platform is especially fraught for people of color who have used Twitter to network and elevate their voices while also confronting toxicity. But for those who rely on Twitter's reach, there are few good alternatives.