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U.S. health officials have authorized a plan to stretch the nation’s limited supply of monkeypox vaccine by giving people just one-fifth the usual dose. In an announcement issued Tuesday, they cited research suggesting that the reduced amount is about as effective. The so-called dose-sparing approach also calls for administering the Jynneos vaccine with an injection just under the skin rather than into deeper tissue — a practice that may rev up the immune system better. The highly unusual step is a stark acknowledgment that the U.S. currently lacks the supplies needed to vaccinate everyone seeking protection from the rapidly spreading virus.

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U.S. demand for grocery delivery is cooling as food prices rise. Some shoppers are shifting to less expensive grocery pickup, while others are returning to the store. Experts say grocery delivery saw five years of growth in the first three months of the pandemic. In June 2020, grocery delivery was a $3.4 billion business. But by June 2022, that had fallen 26%. Consulting firm Chase Design says it's hard to get the delivery premium below $10 because of fuel and labor costs. That premium is tough for some consumers to swallow when food cost inflation is at a four-decade high.

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For Boston subway riders, it seems every week brings a new tale of transit woe. There have been runaway trains, subway cars belching smoke and fire, fatal accidents, rush hour trains running on weekend schedules and brand-new subway cars pulled from service. The situation has stretched the nerves of riders, prompted a probe by the Federal Transit Administration and worried political leaders. One of the more maddening failures came in June when the MBTA temporarily sidelined all its new Orange and Red Line cars. Republican Gov. Charlie Baker says despite the troubles, the vast majority of trips end without drama.

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Reining in the soaring prices of insulin has thus far been elusive in Congress, although Democrats say they’ll try again — as part of their economic package that focuses on health and climate. The price of the 100-year-old drug has more than tripled in the last two decades, forcing the nation’s diabetics to pay thousands of dollars a year for the life-saving medication. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has said some language that limits the price of insulin will be added to the economic bill, but it’s not clear what that price point will be and who will be protected by that price cap.

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A Florida man who was killed in a traffic crash last month could be the 20th death in the U.S. caused by exploding Takata air bag inflators. Authorities say the driver of a 2006 Ford Ranger pickup truck was killed last month near Pensacola, Florida. The driver’s air bag inflator apparently exploded, spewing shrapnel that hit the unidentified driver, a 23-year-old man. The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says Thursday it is working to confirm details of the crash before deciding if more action is needed.

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Health regulators say nearly 800,000 doses of monkeypox vaccine will soon be available for U.S. distribution. The Wednesday announcement follows weeks of delays and growing criticism that authorities have been too slow in deploying the shots. The Food and Drug Administration needed to inspect and certify the standards of a Danish manufacturing plant where the doses are manufactured. The agency said two weeks ago that the inspection had been completed, but the final go-ahead came Wednesday. U.S. health officials say they will announce allocation plans on Thursday. Health departments in San Francisco and other major cities say they still don’t have enough shots to meet demand.

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Temperatures hit 102 degrees Fahrenheit in Portland, Oregon, on what was expected to be the the hottest day of an unusually long heat wave for the Pacific Northwest. That was a new daily record for July 26 for Oregon's largest city. Elsewhere in the region, Seattle also reported a new record daily high of 94 degrees on Tuesday. Forecasters have issued an excessive heat warning for parts of Oregon and Washington state, prompting Oregon Gov. Kate Brown to declare a state of emergency. Portland and Seattle officials have opened emergency cooling shelters. The National Weather Service predicts Portland could break its previous heat wave duration records of six consecutive days that are 95 degrees or warmer.