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The Supreme Court says that a high school football coach who knelt and prayed on the field after games is protected by the Constitution. It's a decision that opponents say will open the door to “much more coercive prayer” in public schools. The court ruled 6-3 for the coach with the court’s conservative justices in the majority and its liberals in dissent. The justices in the majority emphasized that the coach’s prayer happened after the game was over. The liberal justices in the minority said there was evidence that the coach’s prayer at the 50-yard-line had a coercive effect and it let him incorporate his “personal religious beliefs into a school event.”

AP
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One the most spectacular examples of ancient Roman baths, the Baths of Caracalla, has become more spectacular. Authorities have opened to the public remains of a unique 2nd century AD private home featuring a frescoed ceiling and a domestic prayer room honoring Roman and Egyptian religious deities. The two-story home, or “domus,” was partially destroyed to make way for the construction of the Caracalla public baths, which opened in 216 AD. The site today is a big tourist draw for the multi-leveled brick remains of Imperial Roman baths, libraries and gyms and the marble mosaics that decorated the floors. The home is believed to have belonged to a wealthy merchant's family.

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Police say a 70-year-old man who fatally shot three elderly people at a church potluck dinner in Alabama had attended services there previously. Prosecutors charged Robert Findlay Smith with capital murder Friday in the Thursday night attack at St. Stephens Episcopal Church outside Birmingham. Two were victims were 84 and the third one was 75. The church's retired pastor, the Rev. Doug Carpenter, said witnesses told him the gunman sat alone at the dinner and declined to join other members before opening fire. Carpenter said a church member in his 70s rushed the gunmna and struck him with a folding chair and took his gun away.

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This spring Minneapolis became the first large city in the United States to allow the Islamic call to prayer to be broadcast publicly on loudspeakers. So far only one mosque is doing so, three times a day. But more of the city's two dozen mosques are getting ready to start their own broadcasts. They're setting up rooftop sound systems and readying meetings to consult with neighbors, hoping to avoid the kind of backlash that has occurred elsewhere. The transforming soundscape is testament to the large and growing Muslim community in Minneapolis, home to big numbers of refugees from war-torn Somalia.

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Wali Dirie, executive director of the Islamic Civic Society of America Dar Al-Hijrah mosque, opens rooftop speakers used to publicly broadcast the Islamic call to prayer, or adhan, on Thursday, May 12, 2022, in Minneapolis. During the pandemic lockdown in spring 2020, the mosque was given a special permit to broadcast the prayer for the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. That led to a recent resolution authorizing mosques to broadcast the adhan three times a day. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)

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An imam leads Friday prayers at the Dar Al-Hijrah mosque in Minneapolis on Thursday, May 13, 2022. During the pandemic lockdown in spring 2020, the mosque was given a special permit to broadcast the prayer for the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. That led to a recent resolution authorizing mosques to broadcast the adhan three times a day. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)

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Ahmad Abdi looks toward the back of the mosque during Friday prayer at the Dar Al-Hijrah in Minneapolis on Thursday, May 13, 2022. During the pandemic lockdown in spring 2020, the mosque was given a special permit to broadcast the prayer for the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. That led to a recent resolution authorizing mosques to broadcast the adhan three times a day. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)