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This undated photo provided by researcher Bryan Fry shows a Komodo dragon at Komodo National Park in Indonesia. In 2021, construction for tourism in Komodo National Park has raised concerns from the United Nations officials, environmental activists and residents about damage to habitat of the Komodo dragon. (Bryan Fry via AP)

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This undated photo provided by researcher Bryan Fry shows part of Komodo National Park in Indonesia. Encompassing about 850 square miles (2,200 square kilometers) of land and marine area, the park was established in 1980 to help protect the famed dragons. Indonesia's Ministry of Environment and Forestry estimates around 3,000 of the reptiles live there today, along with manatee-like dugongs, sea turtles, whales and more than a thousand species of tropical fish. (Bryan Fry via AP)

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In this undated photo provided by researcher Bryan Fry, a Komodo dragon walks past a water buffalo at Komodo National Park in Indonesia. Because of its biodiversity and beauty, the park became a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization World Heritage Site in 1991. And it's one of Indonesia's crown jewels for tourism, typically drawing hundreds of thousands of visitors from around the world each year. (Bryan Fry via AP)

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This undated photo provided by researcher Bryan Fry shows young Komodo dragons at Komodo National Park in Indonesia. The predatory lizards, which can reach a length of 10 feet (3 meters) and more than 300 pounds (135 kilograms), were recently moved from “vulnerable” to “endangered” status on the IUCN list of threatened species. The organization cited the impacts of climate change and deterioration of the dragons’ habitat -- including human encroachment — as reasons for the change. (Bryan Fry via AP)

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In this 2008-2012 photo provided by researcher Bryan Fry people fish at a village on Rinca Island at Komodo National Park in Indonesia. Part of a multi-million dollar tourism development is a project on Rinca Island, where more than one-third of the park’s dragons are estimated to live. (Bryan Fry via AP)

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This undated photo provided by researcher Bryan Fry shows a Komodo dragon at Komodo National Park in Indonesia. The predatory lizards, which can reach a length of 10 feet (3 meters) and more than 300 pounds (135 kilograms), were recently moved from “vulnerable” to “endangered” status on the IUCN list of threatened species. The organization cited the impacts of climate change and deterioration of the dragons’ habitat -- including human encroachment — as reasons for the change. (Bryan Fry via AP)

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This undated photo provided by researcher Bryan Fry shows a beach at Komodo National Park in Indonesia. Encompassing about 850 square miles (2,200 square kilometers) of land and marine area, Komodo National Park was established in 1980 to help protect the famed dragons. Indonesia's Ministry of Environment and Forestry estimates around 3,000 of the reptiles live there today, along with manatee-like dugongs, sea turtles, whales and more than a thousand species of tropical fish. (Bryan Fry via AP)

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This undated photo provided by researcher Bryan Fry shows Komodo dragons at Komodo National Park in Indonesia. The predatory lizards, which can reach a length of 10 feet (3 meters) and more than 300 pounds (135 kilograms), were recently moved from “vulnerable” to “endangered” status on the IUCN list of threatened species. The organization cited the impacts of climate change and deterioration of the dragons’ habitat -- including human encroachment — as reasons for the change. (Bryan Fry via AP)

  • Updated

This undated photo provided by researcher Bryan Fry shows Komodo dragons at Komodo National Park in Indonesia. The predatory lizards, which can reach a length of 10 feet (3 meters) and more than 300 pounds (135 kilograms), were recently moved from “vulnerable” to “endangered” status on the IUCN list of threatened species. The organization cited the impacts of climate change and deterioration of the dragons’ habitat -- including human encroachment — as reasons for the change. (Bryan Fry via AP)

  • Updated

This undated photo provided by researcher Bryan Fry shows a Komodo dragon at Komodo National Park in Indonesia. The predatory lizards, which can reach a length of 10 feet (3 meters) and more than 300 pounds (135 kilograms), were recently moved from “vulnerable” to “endangered” status on the IUCN list of threatened species. The organization cited the impacts of climate change and deterioration of the dragons’ habitat -- including human encroachment — as reasons for the change. (Bryan Fry via AP)