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FILE- Matthew Heimbach, center, voices his displeasure at the media in front of court in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 14, 2017, after a court hearing for James Alex Fields Jr., who is accused of plowing his car into a crowd at a white nationalist rally. A Charlottesville jury found five white supremacist and Neo-Nazi organizations and their leaders liable for millions of dollars in damages at a trial four years after violence rocked the Virginia city during the Unite the Right rally. But whether the nine plaintiffs who brought the suit will ever be able to collect the money remains to be seen. Heimbach who co-founded the Traditionalist Worker Party with fellow defendant Matthew Parrott, said he is a single father to two young sons, works at a factory and lives paycheck to paycheck (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

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FILE - Roberta Kaplan, a lead lawyer in Sines v. Kessler, poses for a photo in Atherton Calif., on Nov. 12, 2019. A Charlottesville jury found five white supremacist and Neo-Nazi organizations and their leaders liable for millions of dollars in damages at a trial four years after violence rocked the Virginia city during the Unite the Right rally. But whether the nine plaintiffs who brought the suit will ever be able to collect the money remains to be seen. (AP Photo/D. Ross Cameron, File)

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FILE - White nationalist Richard Spencer speaks at the University of Florida on Oct. 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Fla. A jury ordered white nationalist leaders and organizations to pay more than $25 million in damages Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, over violence that erupted during the deadly 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville. The lawsuit accused some of the country’s most well-known white nationalists of plotting the violence, including Jason Kessler, the rally’s main organizer; Richard Spencer, who coined the term “alt-right” to describe a loosely connected band of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and others; and Christopher Cantwell, a white supremacist who became known as the “crying Nazi” for posting a tearful video when a warrant was issued for his arrest on assault charges for using pepper spray against counterdemonstrators. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)

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FILE - White nationalist Jason Kessler, center, walks to the White House to rally on the one year anniversary of the Charlottesville "Unite the Right" rally on Aug. 12, 2018, in Washington. A jury ordered white nationalist leaders and organizations to pay more than $25 million in damages Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, over violence that erupted during the deadly 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville. The lawsuit accused some of the country’s most well-known white nationalists of plotting the violence, including Jason Kessler, the rally’s main organizer; Richard Spencer, who coined the term “alt-right” to describe a loosely connected band of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and others; and Christopher Cantwell, a white supremacist who became known as the “crying Nazi” for posting a tearful video when a warrant was issued for his arrest on assault charges for using pepper spray against counterdemonstrators. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

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FILE - This undated photo provided by the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail shows Christopher Cantwell. A jury ordered white nationalist leaders and organizations to pay more than $25 million in damages Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, over violence that erupted during the deadly 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville. The lawsuit accused some of the country’s most well-known white nationalists of plotting the violence, including Jason Kessler, the rally’s main organizer; Richard Spencer, who coined the term “alt-right” to describe a loosely connected band of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and others; and Christopher Cantwell, a white supremacist who became known as the “crying Nazi” for posting a tearful video when a warrant was issued for his arrest on assault charges for using pepper spray against counterdemonstrators.(Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via AP)