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The Supreme Court's ruling allowing states to regulate abortion has set off a travel scramble in some parts of the U.S.,  as abortion providers redirect patients to states that still allow the procedure. A growing number of states are moving to mostly banning abortion. Clinics operators are moving, doctors are counseling crying patients, donations are pouring into nonprofits and one group is dispatching vans to administer abortion pills. Some cities _ like Kansas City and St. Louis _ also are drafting plans to help with the travel logistics. Groups are trying to help with everything from gas cards for travel to connecting patients with small aircraft pilots willing to transport them to a clinic in another state.

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Colorado Republicans have rejected two prominent election deniers in primaries Tuesday night. It's a setback for the movement to install backers of former President Donald Trump's election lies in positions with power over voting. Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters lost the Republican primary for secretary of state to Pam Anderson, a former clerk in suburban Denver. Peters was indicted for her role in a break-in of her county's election system. An ally, State Rep. Ron Hanks, lost his bid for the GOP Senate nomination. Hanks attended the Jan. 6 protests. He was beaten by businessman Joe O'Dea, a rare GOP backer of some abortion rights.

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FILE - Abortion-rights activists protest outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Saturday, June 25, 2022. The Supreme Court's ruling allowing states to regulate abortion has set off a mad travel scramble across the country to direct patients to states that still allow the procedure. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

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FILE - Mitzi Rivas, left, hugs her daughter Maya Iribarren during an abortion-rights protest at City Hall in San Francisco, following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Friday, June 24, 2022. The Supreme Court's ruling allowing states to regulate abortion has set off a mad travel scramble across the country to direct patients to states that still allow the procedure. (AP Photo/Josie Lepe, File)

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Kathy Hochul has won the Democratic nomination for New York governor, setting her on an expected path to win the governor’s office in November. Hochul beat back primary challenges Tuesday from New York City’s elected public advocate, Jumaane Williams, and U.S. Rep. Tom Suozzi, a moderate from Long Island. Democrats have more than twice as many registered voters as Republicans in the state and are expected to keep the governor’s mansion this fall. Republicans nominated U.S. Rep. Lee Zeldin to challenge Hochul in November. The Long Island representative was among the Republicans in Congress who voted against certifying the 2020 election results.

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The NFL insisted on an indefinite suspension while Deshaun Watson’s legal team argued there’s no basis for that punishment as both sides presented their cases in front of a retired judge in Delaware on Tuesday, two people in attendance told The Associated Press. The hearing will continue on Wednesday and Watson is scheduled to be there for the duration, according to the people who spoke on condition of anonymity because the hearing isn’t public. Former U.S. District Judge Sue Robinson, who was jointly appointed by the league and the NFL Players’ Association, will determine whether Watson violated the NFL’s personal conduct policy and whether to impose discipline.

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Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has told lawmakers in Edinburgh that she plans to hold a fresh referendum on Scottish independence on Oct. 19, 2023. That's despite U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson saying it wasn’t the right time for such a vote. Scottish voters rejected independence in the 2014 referendum. The U.K.-wide government headed by Johnson has said the issue was settled in the 2014 vote. Scotland’s government requires a special order from Johnson to legally hold a referendum. Sturgeon said she will ask the U.K. Supreme Court to rule on the Scottish government’s right to hold the vote if Johnson does not give the go-ahead.

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Five of New Hampshire’s Republican U.S. Senate hopefuls are suggesting they don’t support enacting federal abortion legislation though most initially sidestepped the question during their first debate. Donald Bolduc, Bruce Fenton, Vikram Mansharamani, Chuck Morse and Kevin Smith were asked Monday whether they would support federal laws restricting abortion after the Supreme Court ended constitutional protections. While all praised the decision, Fenton was the only candidate who clearly said no to federal legislation. The others indicated their opposition only by not raising their hands when a moderator pressed them to take a position. U.S. Sen. Maggie Hassan, the Democrat they want to unseat, argues that several of them have made it clear they would back such legislation.

AP
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Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez says the NATO summit in Madrid this week aims to showcase the Western allies' united front in defense of democratic values in the face of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, while providing a platform to increase the bloc’s deterrence capabilities. He reiterated the alliance would not tolerate any territorial aggression against its members. In an interview with The Associated Press a day before the summit begins Tuesday, Sanchez said Putin is not just invading Ukraine, but wants to destabilize and weaken the security and the prosperity of Europe. He stressed that the alliance will defend every centimeter of allied territory.

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The Supreme Court’s decision to overturn national protections for abortion has set off a contest between Democratic and Republican lawmakers over whose policies would do more to help vulnerable mothers and children. It's a key issue going into the midterm elections. Republicans such as Florida Sen. Rick Scott say that GOP lawmakers have the responsibility to “do everything in our power to meet the needs of struggling women and their families so they can choose life.” Democrats suggest their rivals are hypocrites who would offer half-measures at best and that voters should judge them accordingly.