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Social media users shared a range of false claims this week. Here are the facts: A 2019 amendment to a Kentucky abortion law was proposed as satire and not seriously considered. A Department of Defense statement issued after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade did not say the Pentagon would defy the ruling, nor did it say it would violate any state laws on the matter. Pallets of bricks pictured on a Washington, D.C., street were for ongoing construction, not to incite rioting. Research at a Tennessee laboratory studied neutron activity, not a portal to a parallel universe.

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The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection has issued a subpoena to former White House counsel Pat Cipollone. His reported resistance to Donald Trump’s schemes to overturn his 2020 election defeat has made him a long-sought and potentially revelatory witness. Cipollone is said to have stridently and repeatedly warned the former president and his allies against their efforts to challenge the election. The subpoena issued Wednesday is the first action from the committee since the testimony of former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson. Her gripping account of what she saw and heard has raised new questions about whether Trump or some of his allies could face criminal liability.

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Colorado Republicans have rejected an indicted county clerk as their nominee for secretary of state, choosing a former local official who ran on a platform of taking politics out of running elections. In spurning Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters, the bulk of Republican primary voters appeared to reject the conspiracy theories and false claims that have spread among conservatives since the November 2020 presidential election. Over the last year, Peters has appeared regularly with prominent allies of former President Donald Trump, who claims without evidence that the election was stolen from him.

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Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani is not the guy most politicians would summon to hold a news conference for them, not after his false assertions of election fraud. But one place where Giuliani is in high demand these days is on his son Andrew's long shot campaign to win the GOP nomination for governor of New York. Andrew Giuliani worked as an aide in the Trump White House and as a commentator on the conservative network Newsmax, but he has never held elected office. His father says that when he was mayor and his son a teenager, his son was helpful to him.

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Social media users shared a range of false claims this week. Here are the facts: A photo of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in front of a green screen was taken in Kyiv for a virtual conference address, not outside of the country. A video claiming to show a Russian missile was created using visual effects. A man who was charged with child pornography didn’t work for Drag Queen Story Hour. A video shows dead sheep in the country of Georgia, not Idaho. And an image purporting to show a headline from The Atlantic about “Biden’s bike fall” is fabricated.

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Former top Justice Department officials have testified to the Jan. 6 committee that President Donald Trump hounded the department to pursue his false election fraud claims. They say he contacted the agency’s leader “virtually every day” and strove in vain to enlist the government’s top law enforcement officials in his desperate bid to stay in power. The House panel investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol also revealed Thursday that several Republican loyalists in Congress who trumpeted the president’s claims later sought pardons from the White House after the effort failed.

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The House Jan. 6 committee used its hearing Thursday to show how Donald Trump tried to install a loyalist atop the Justice Department who would pursue his false claims of voter fraud and stop the certification of the 2020 election that Democrat Joe Biden won. It’s the latest account of how perilously close the United States could have come to a constitutional crisis if the defeated president had been able to orchestrate a plan for the U.S. government to overturn election results in several pivotal states. The committee has been trying to make the case that Trump’s efforts to reverse his loss resulted in the deadly siege at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

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A rural New Mexico county’s initial refusal to certify its primary election results sent ripples across the country last week. It was a symbol of how even the most elemental functions of democracy have become politicized pressure points amid the swirl of lies stemming from the 2020 presidential outcome. After the Otero County Commission finally relented, one question persisted: Why New Mexico, a state that has not been a political battleground and where Joe Biden beat Donald Trump handily two years ago? The seeds of the short-lived election crisis had been planted months before, when conspiracy theories and false claims about the last presidential election began to dominate political discussion in the heavily Republican county.

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A former Georgia election worker in gripping testimony has told the House Jan. 6 committee about the onslaught of threats that she and her family received after former President Trump and his allies falsely accused her and her mother of pulling fraudulent ballots from a suitcase. Wandrea “Shaye” Moss told lawmakers Tuesday how her life was upended when Trump and his allies latched onto surveillance footage from November 2020 to accuse her and her mother of committing voter fraud, allegations that were quickly debunked. The committee also heard from high-ranking elections officials in Georgia and a lawmaker in Arizona who were also on the wrong end of Trump's pressure campaign.

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The House Jan. 6 committee has heard chilling, tearful testimony that Donald Trump’s relentless pressure to overturn the 2020 presidential election led to widespread threats against local workers and state officials. The panel focused Tuesday on the “heroes” of American democracy — election workers and officials who fended off the defeated president’s demands. The committee is focused on Trump's schemes to reject state tallies and electors, all fueled by his false claims of election fraud. It heard from Arizona’s Republican state House Speaker Rusty Bowers and Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger about phone call pressure from Trump, including Trump’s call asking the Georgia official to “find 11,780” votes to prevent Joe Biden’s election victory and others.