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AP
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China’s 11 million university graduates are struggling in a bleak job market this summer as repeated shutdowns under China’s zero-COVID lockdowns forced companies to retrench and driven many restaurants and other small employers out of business. When Liu Qian entered the job market, she said she felt as if her future had been smashed and didn’t know if she could piece it together. The 26-year-old graduate sent out more than 100 job applications and saw two openings she had interviewed for eliminated before landing a job. Countless others are still looking. China’s job drought echoes the difficulties of young people worldwide to find work in depressed economies.

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Jury selection has started in the second trial of two men charged with conspiring to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer in 2020 over their disgust with restrictions early in the COVID-19 pandemic. Prosecutors are putting Adam Fox and Barry Croft Jr. on trial again after a jury in April couldn’t reach a verdict. Two other men were acquitted and two more pleaded guilty. Prospective jurors reported Tuesday to the federal courthouse in Grand Rapids. The government says the plot to kidnap the Democratic governor followed training in Wisconsin and Michigan and two trips to scout her second home in northern Michigan. Defense attorneys will hammer away at the credibility of undercover FBI agents and informants. They say Fox and Croft were victims of entrapment.

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U.S. intelligence agencies are shifting more money and resources to China. They're moving hundreds of officers to China-focused positions, including some who were previously working on terrorism. One year after ending the war in Afghanistan, President Joe Biden and top national security officials speak less about counterterrorism and more about the political, economic and military threats posed by China as well as Russia. In a recent closed-door meeting with leaders of the CIA's counterterrorism center, the CIA’s No. 2 official made clear that fighting al-Qaida and other extremist groups will remain a priority but that there's an increasing focus on China.

AP
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The capital of China’s Hainan province has locked down its residents for 13 hours as a COVID-19 outbreak grows on the tropical island during the summer school holidays. More than 470 new cases were recorded in the province on Sunday. The temporary lockdown of Haikou city from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. follows an ongoing and indefinite lockdown of the beach resort of Sanya since Saturday. Some 80,000 tourists have reportedly been stranded in Sanya. Tourists wanting to leave must test negative five times over seven days. China has stuck to a “zero-COVID” approach despite the economic and social costs.

AP
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Hong Kong will reduce the mandatory hotel quarantine for overseas arrivals to three days from a week. It's one of the few places in the world still requiring a quarantine to guard against travelers spreading COVID-19 to the local population. Hong Kong leader John Lee said arriving travelers must quarantine three days in a hotel, then undergo four days of medical surveillance during which their movements will be restricted. Travelers will also have to test regularly for COVID-19. The changes to COVID-19 policies come amid an increase in infections, which city health officials warn could double to 8,000 in the coming weeks. Hong Kong's severe entry restrictions during the pandemic have devastated its tourism industry and disrupted business travel.

AP
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In this photo released by Xinhua News Agency, volunteers deliver fruits to a trapped tourist at a hotel in Sanya in south China's Hainan Province on Sunday, Aug. 7, 2022. The capital of China's Hainan province has locked down its residents for 13 hours as a COVID-19 outbreak grows on the tropical island during the summer school holidays. (Guo Cheng/Xinhua via AP)

AP
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In this photo released by Xinhua News Agency, a volunteer in protective gears uses a loud speaker to advise people to keep social distancing at a COVID-19 testing site in Sanya in south China's Hainan Province on Sunday, Aug. 7, 2022. The capital of China's Hainan province has locked down its residents for 13 hours as a COVID-19 outbreak grows on the tropical island during the summer school holidays. (Zhao Yingquan/Xinhua via AP)

AP
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In this photo released by Xinhua News Agency, tourists wearing face masks wait in line to get their COVID-19 test at a coronavirus testing site in Sanya in south China's Hainan Province on Sunday, Aug. 7, 2022. The capital of China's Hainan province has locked down its residents for 13 hours as a COVID-19 outbreak grows on the tropical island during the summer school holidays. (Guo Cheng/Xinhua via AP)

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In Portland, Oregon, the police chief recently pulled detectives from cold case and assault units to backfill the homicide unit, which is overwhelmed by a spike in gun violence. In Philadelphia, the police disbanded its abandoned car unit and in Los Angeles, homeless outreach and animal cruelty teams have largely shut down. In major American cities, police departments are losing officers and can’t find enough recruits to replace them. Pandemic burnout, budget cuts and anti-police protests after George Floyd’s murder have combined to reduce police ranks and many departments are downsizing. The evolution has affected residents in ways large and small.

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Over five decades in Washington, Joe Biden knew that the way to influence was to be in the room where it happens. But in the second year of his presidency, some of Biden’s most striking, legacy-defining legislative victories have come about by staying out of it. It's a counterintuitive turn for Biden, who's long promoted his decades of Capitol Hill experience. Biden’s aides chalk up his victories to the fact that he's playing the role of cheerleader rather than legislative quarterback. Democratic Sen. Jon Tester of Montana says that in Biden's heart, he's a U.S. senator. And because of that, Tester says Biden "understands allowing this to work is how you get it done.”