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Decades of anti-abortion laws have been created in some states, and many of them conflict with each other. Idaho has nearly three dozen anti-abortion laws dating back to 1973, and Attorney General Lawrence Wasden's office says he i giving them all a close look to see which might be enforceable now that the U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade. But it's not an easy question — in Arizona, leaders in the Republican Party disagree over whether an abortion law from 1901 should be enforced over a 2022 version. Grant Loebs is the president of the Idaho Prosecuting Attorneys Association. He says decision on whether to charge someone under an older abortion law will probably come down to individual prosecutors at first.

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The U.S. Justice Department has launched a sweeping inquiry into the New York Police Department unit that investigates sex crimes following years of complaints about the way it treats crime victims. The civil rights investigation announced Thursday will review the department’s Special Victims Division to examine whether it engages in a pattern of gender-biased policing. Justice Department officials say they will be reaching out to community groups and the public to learn about their interactions with the division. U.S. Attorney Breon Peace says the NYPD has already taken steps to address concerns, but authorities want to ensure sex assault victims are treated fair in the future.

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Cain Velasquez, the former UFC heavyweight champion accused of trying to kill the man he claims molested his 4-year-old son, is suing the man and his family who own a day care where the alleged molestation occurred. Velasquez was arrested in San Jose, California, last February after prosecutors said he shot at a pickup truck carrying the man through busy streets. His criminal trial is pending. Velasquez claims in the civil lawsuit that the man he's accused of targeting had sexually molested Velasquez’s son while the boy was attending the day care.

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Cristiano Ronaldo wants a U.S. judge to order a woman’s lawyer to pay the international soccer star more than $626,000 after claiming in a failed lawsuit in 2018 that Ronaldo raped the woman in Las Vegas nearly a decade earlier. The woman’s attorney, Leslie Mark Stovall, didn't immediately respond Wednesday to messages about the request. The judge on June 10 kicked the case out of court to punish Stovall for “bad-faith conduct” and the improper use of leaked and stolen documents to press the woman's case. The bid for court costs and fees dwarfs a $375,000 hush-money payment the woman received in 2010 to drop her claim she was sexually assaulted.

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FILE- Manchester United's Cristiano Ronaldo stands on the pitch during the English Premier League soccer match between Manchester United and Norwich City at Old Trafford stadium in Manchester, England, on April 16, 2022. Ronaldo is asking a U.S. judge to order a woman's lawyer to pay more than $626,000 for losing a lawsuit to get the international soccer star to pay millions of dollars after claiming in 2018 that Ronaldo raped the woman in Las Vegas nearly a decade earlier. (AP Photo/Jon Super, File)

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R. Kelly’s musical accomplishments have been accompanied by a long history of allegations that he sexually abused women and children. Now the R&B singer has been sentenced to spend the next three decades behind bars. A jury found Kelly guilty in September of sex trafficking and racketeering charges. Kelly has vehemently denied the allegations, but his accusers testified in detail that he subjected them to perverse and sadistic whims when they were underage. Kelly still faces a trial in Chicago on charges of child pornography and obstruction of justice.

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The FBI has opened a widening investigation into sex abuse in the Roman Catholic Church in New Orleans, looking specifically at whether priests took children across state lines to molest them. That's according to law enforcement officials and others familiar with the inquiry who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.  More than a dozen alleged abuse victims have so far been interviewed as part of the probe that comes as the Archdiocese of New Orleans reels from a bankruptcy brought on by a flood of sex abuse lawsuits and allegations church leaders turned a blind eye to generations of predator priests.

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A lawsuit alleges the Houston Texans had been told that their former quarterback Deshaun Watson was sexually assaulting and harassing women during massage sessions, but instead of trying to stop him, the team provided him with resources to enable his actions and “turned a blind eye” to his behavior. The lawsuit against the team was filed in Houston on Monday by one of the 24 women who had previously sued Watson over allegations of sexual misconduct when he played for the Texans. In a statement, the Houston Texans said the team would “take the necessary steps to address the allegations against our organization." Watson is set to have a hearing this week over whether he will be disciplined by the NFL.

AP

Three people familiar with the meeting tell AP that Cleveland Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson will have a hearing with NFL disciplinary officer Sue L. Robinson next week. Watson is facing a potential suspension from the league stemming from accusations of sexual misconduct by massage therapists in Texas. He will meet with Robinson on Tuesday, said the persons who spoke on condition of anonymity because details of the hearing have not been disclosed publicly. ESPN earlier reported Watson’s meeting with Robinson, who was jointly appointed by the league and NFL Players Association. This is the first case the former federal judge has heard. Earlier this week, Watson reached undisclosed financial settlements in civil lawsuits filed by 20 of his 24 accusers.

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Maine Attorney General Aaron Frey says religious schools seeking to take advantage of a state tuition program must abide by state law banning discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. He says that could deter some of them from participation despite a Supreme Court decision this week. The high court ruled that Maine can’t exclude religious schools from a program that offers tuition aid for private education in towns that don’t have public schools. One of the attorneys who successfully sued says the state can balance the interests of all parties if elected officials “are genuinely committed to that task.”