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New York’s legislature has approved a sweeping overhaul of the state’s handgun licensing rules, seeking to preserve some limits after the Supreme Court said people have a right to carry a handgun for personal protection. Gov. Kathy Hochul signed the measure into law after it passed both chambers by wide margins. The law is almost sure to draw more legal challenges from gun-rights advocates who said the state is still putting too many restrictions on who can get a gun and where they can carry it. Backers said the new law will strike the right balance between complying with the Supreme Court’s ruling and trying to ensure that weapons stay out of the hands of criminals.

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Decades of anti-abortion laws have been created in some states, and many of them conflict with each other. Idaho has nearly three dozen anti-abortion laws dating back to 1973, and Attorney General Lawrence Wasden's office says he i giving them all a close look to see which might be enforceable now that the U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade. But it's not an easy question — in Arizona, leaders in the Republican Party disagree over whether an abortion law from 1901 should be enforced over a 2022 version. Grant Loebs is the president of the Idaho Prosecuting Attorneys Association. He says decision on whether to charge someone under an older abortion law will probably come down to individual prosecutors at first.

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Social media users shared a range of false claims this week. Here are the facts: A 2019 amendment to a Kentucky abortion law was proposed as satire and not seriously considered. A Department of Defense statement issued after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade did not say the Pentagon would defy the ruling, nor did it say it would violate any state laws on the matter. Pallets of bricks pictured on a Washington, D.C., street were for ongoing construction, not to incite rioting. Research at a Tennessee laboratory studied neutron activity, not a portal to a parallel universe.

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Alabama  is using the U.S. Supreme Court decision on abortion to argue that the state should also be able to ban gender-affirming medical treatments for transgender youth. The state is asking the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift an injunction against an Alabama law that would make it a felony to give puberty blockers or hormones to transgender minors to help affirm their gender identity. The case marks one of the first known instances in which a conservative state has tried to apply the abortion decision to other realms, just as LGBTQ advocates and others feared would happen.

AP

The first year of the NIL era in college sports evolved into almost everything the NCAA didn’t want when it gave the green light for athletes to cash in on their celebrity. What was envisioned as a way for college athletes to make some pocket money has turned into bidding wars for football and men’s basketball recruits and transfers. Industry experts say something must be done to keep college sports from going off the rails. Possibilities are athlete unionization and giving athletic departments more control over NIL.

AP
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Chinese leader Xi Jinping arrived in Hong Kong to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the British handover of a city that his rule has transformed from a global hub known for its political freedoms to one that is much more tightly controlled by the Communist Party. In a staged event carried live on Chinese TV, students and others greeted the leader Thursday. He is making his first trip outside of mainland China in nearly 2 ½ years. Under Xi’s leadership, China has reshaped Hong Kong, imposing a strict national security law used to silence dissent and revamping election laws to keep opposition politicians out of the city’s Legislature. The changes have all but eliminated dissenting voices in a place once known for its vibrant political debate.

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Arizona’s Republican attorney general says a total ban on abortions that has been on the books since before statehood can be enforced. Attorney General Mark Brnovich's decision puts him at odds with GOP Gov. Doug Ducey, who says a 15-week abortion ban he signed in March takes precedence. Also Wednesday, Louisiana’s attorney general is warning doctors against performing abortions, despite a judge’s order blocking the state from enforcing its ban on the procedure. Attorney General Jeff Landry said that the state judge’s Monday order blocking enforcement “has limited reach” and that abortion remains a crime in Louisiana after Friday’s Supreme Court decision ending abortion rights. That decision has prompted legal fights in multiple states.

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Five of New Hampshire’s Republican U.S. Senate hopefuls are suggesting they don’t support enacting federal abortion legislation though most initially sidestepped the question during their first debate. Donald Bolduc, Bruce Fenton, Vikram Mansharamani, Chuck Morse and Kevin Smith were asked Monday whether they would support federal laws restricting abortion after the Supreme Court ended constitutional protections. While all praised the decision, Fenton was the only candidate who clearly said no to federal legislation. The others indicated their opposition only by not raising their hands when a moderator pressed them to take a position. U.S. Sen. Maggie Hassan, the Democrat they want to unseat, argues that several of them have made it clear they would back such legislation.

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Judges have temporarily blocked abortion bans in Louisiana and Utah, while a federal court in South Carolina said a law sharply restricting the procedure would take effect there immediately. The decisions emerged as the battle over whether women may end pregnancies shifted from the nation’s highest court to courthouses around the country. The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision Friday to end constitutional protection for abortion opened the gates for a wave of litigation. One side sought quickly to put statewide bans into effect, and the other tried to stop or at least delay such measures. Much of Monday’s court activity focused on “trigger laws,” adopted in 13 states that were designed to take effect swiftly after the ruling.

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A court ruling is back in effect that blocks President Joe Biden from requiring federal employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19. A Texas-based federal judge had blocked the federal employee vaccine mandate in January. But a three-member panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans ruled the judge didn’t have jurisdiction and that employees opposed to the mandate should have pursued civil service remedies. Now, the full 17-member 5th Circuit court has decided to take another look at the issue. That means the Texas judge’s block on the mandate remains in effect.