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Costa Rica has been reeling from unprecedented ransomware attacks disrupting everyday life in the Central American nation for the last two months. The situation is raising questions about the United States' role in protecting friendly nations from cyberattacks when Russian-based criminal gangs are targeting less developed countries in ways that could have major global repercussions. Experts believe developing countries like Costa Rica are ripe targets for ransomware gangs, which have stopped going after “big-game” targets after several high-profile attacks last year, including a pipeline attack that led to major gas shortages in parts of the United States.

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China is the foremost challenge for U.S. national security agencies, a so-called “hard target” that is America’s chief rival for global dominance. But as the agencies ramp up their efforts to spy on Beijing, they also acknowledge Chinese Americans may end up having more of their phone calls and emails captured unintentionally. A new Biden administration report makes several recommendations for the intelligence community. Among them are expanding unconscious bias training, and reiterating to their workforces that targeting someone strictly due to their ethnicity is illegal.

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White nationalists and supremacists are building thriving, macho communities across social media platforms like Instagram, Telegram and TikTok. The accounts are using coded hashtags and innuendo to rile up thousands of followers on divisive issues like abortion and recent mass shootings. Those are the issues the department of Homeland Security warned Tuesday might drive some extremists to violently attack public places across the U.S. The heightened concern comes just weeks after a white 18-year-old who claims he was radicalized on internet chatrooms entered a supermarket in Buffalo, New York, with the goal of killing Black patrons. He gunned down 10.

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U.S. intelligence agencies have begun a review of how they judge the will and ability of foreign governments to fight. American spy services underestimated Ukraine's will to fight while overestimating Russia's ability to overrun its neighbor, even as those agencies accurately predicted Russian President Vladimir Putin would order an invasion. The agencies now face bipartisan pressure to review what they got wrong beforehand, especially after their mistakes in judging Afghanistan last year. U.S. intelligence continues to have a critical role in Ukraine, and as the White House ramps up weapons deliveries to Ukraine, officials are trying to predict what Putin might see as escalatory and the U.S. is seeking to avoid a direct war with Russia.