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Nearly two months after a deadly shooting a Texas elementary school, a Texas House of Representatives committee report found that nearly 400 officers from local, state and federal agencies responded to the 77-minute rampage in which 19 kids and two teachers died. According to the report, frequent lockdowns contributed to a "diminished sense of vigilance about responding to security alerts.” Nearly 50 security alerts and lockdowns were called in Uvalde since February, many of which are attributed to “bailouts”--- a local term for people fleeing from law enforcement after crossing into the U.S., according to the report.

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The newspaper in Maine’s largest city is decrying the use of its parent company name in a national conservative group’s political survey. The name of the survey — “Maine Today & Public Insight” — led some to believe it had something to do with MaineToday Media, which owns the Portland Press Herald, Kennebec Journal and Morning Sentinel. Steve Greenlee, executive editor of the Press Herald, said in a statement that “misappropriating the name of a news organization in an attempt to legitimatize a survey is unacceptable and unethical.” The survey asked questions about welfare for illegal immigrants, critical race theory and gender issues.

AP
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The candidates to become the next British prime minister are appealing to their right-wing base as they seek to replace Boris Johnson. Many of the five remaining hopefuls are highlighting Brexit and immigration as they attempt to woo fellow Conservative lawmakers and party members ahead of a third round of voting on Monday, when another contender will drop out. Even though the eventual winner will automatically become U.K. prime minister, the contenders must appeal to a narrow constituency of party members, who tend to be whiter, older and more right-wing than the general public.

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Two landmark new studies in France are bursting myths about immigration at a time when xenophobic far-right discourse has gained more attention. They highlight that the children of immigrants are increasingly melting into French society but also point out persistent discrimination against some people with African and Asian backgrounds. People trying to fight discrimination in France welcomed the new data, which is rare because the country doesn’t differentiate citizens by ethnic groups. One report found that a large swath of France's population has an immigrant ancestor. An estimated 32% of people under 60 are first, second or third-generation immigrants in the European Union country. But researchers say immigration is not widely or evenly spread out across France.

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FILE - A crowd watch French President Emmanuel Macron and centrist candidate for reelection arriving in the village of Spezet, Brittany, April 5, 2022. Two landmark new studies in France are busting myths about immigration, at a time when xenophobic far-right discourse has gained ground, highlighting that immigration is melting into society but also pointing out persistent discrimination against some groups with immigrant backgrounds.(AP Photo/Jeremias Gonzalez, File)

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FILE - A woman dressed up as Marianne, a woman symbol of the French republic since the 1789 revolution, holds a French flag during a May Day demonstration in Marseille, southern France, May 1, 2022. Two landmark new studies in France are busting myths about immigration, at a time when xenophobic far-right discourse has gained ground, highlighting that immigration is melting into society but also pointing out persistent discrimination against some groups with immigrant backgrounds. (AP Photo/Daniel Cole, File)

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The president of Sri Lanka has fled the country. Gotabaya Rajapaksa slipped away in the middle of the night only hours before he was to step down amid a devastating economic crisis that has triggered severe shortages of food and fuel. An immigration official said the president, his wife and two bodyguards left aboard a Sri Lankan Air Force plane bound for the Maldives. The president’s departure followed months of demonstrations that culminated Saturday in protesters storming his home and office and the official residence of his prime minister. Sri Lankans continued to stream into the presidential palace Wednesday morning. But they said they weren't celebrating Rajapaksa's departure because “we have nothing.”

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Mexican President Andres Manuel López Obrador has agreed during meetings with President Joe Biden to spend $1.5 billion to improve “smart” border technology. It's a move the White House says shows neighborly cooperation succeeding where Trump administration vows to wall off the border and have Mexico pay for it could not. A person familiar with a series of agreements signed after the two leaders met Tuesday says they also called for expanding the number of work visas the U.S. issues and welcoming more refugees. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because the agreement hadn’t been formally announced.

AP
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Four-time Olympic champion Mo Farah says he was illegally brought to the U.K. as a young boy and forced to care for other children before he escaped a life of servitude through running. In a new documentary, Farah says his real name is Hussein Abdi Kahin and that he was from taken from the East African nation of Djibouti. The film was produced by the BBC and Red Bull Studios, and is scheduled for broadcast Wednesday. Farah says he was 8 or 9 when a woman he didn’t know brought him to Britain using fake travel documents that included his picture alongside the name Mohammed Farah.

AP
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Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador is visiting Washington on Tuesday to meet with President Joe Biden. The trip comes a month after López Obrador snubbed Biden’s invitation to the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles. And the Mexican leader has called U.S. support for Ukraine “a crass error.” On the other side, U.S. officials want López Obrador to retreat on his preference for fossil fuels. The U.S.-Mexico relationship was a straightforward tradeoff during the Trump adminstration, with Mexico tamping down on migration and the U.S. not pressing on other issues. Now it has become a wide range of disagreements over trade, foreign policy, energy and climate change.