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AP
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A staggering 71 million more people around the world are experiencing poverty as a result of soaring food and energy prices that climbed in the weeks following Russia’s war in Ukraine. The United Nations Development Program's report released Thursday estimates that 51.6 million more people fell into poverty in the first three months after Russia invaded Ukraine, living off $1.90 a day or less. An additional 20 million people slipped to the poverty line of $3.20 a day. The UNDP recommends that rather than spending billions on blanket energy subsidies, governments instead target expenditure to reach the most impacted and affected people through targeted cash transfers.

AP
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South African President Cyril Ramaphosa said the deaths of 21 teenagers in a nightclub tragedy is a crime and South African officials must increase steps to prevent alcohol from being illegally sold to youths. Ramaphosa spoke to more than a thousand mourners at the funeral in East London for the young people who died at a tavern nearly two weeks ago. It’s still not known what caused the deaths of the young people, one just 13 years old, whose bodies were found in the Enyobeni tavern. Officials said they were under South Africa's legal drinking age of 18. Pathologists are studying the cause of death from blood samples.

AP
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The war in Ukraine has abruptly drawn millions of dollars away from longer-running humanitarian crises. Somalia is perhaps the most vulnerable as thousands die of hunger amid the driest drought in decades. Aid funding for Somalia is less than half of last year’s level as donors, overwhelmingly from the West, have sent more than $1.7 billion to respond to the war in Europe. The Norwegian Refugee Council secretary general tells The Associated Press he's “angry and ashamed" watching under-resourced aid workers in Somalia forced to make “horrific” choices about which desperately hungry people to help.

AP
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Dhahabo Isse, 60, describes how she fled from the drought without food or water causing four of her children to die of hunger, outside her makeshift tent at a camp for the displaced on the outskirts of Mogadishu, Somalia Thursday, June 30, 2022. The war in Ukraine has abruptly drawn millions of dollars away from longer-running humanitarian crises and Somalia is perhaps the most vulnerable as thousands die of hunger amid the driest drought in decades. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

AP
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The low-income Enchanted Valley community just outside Rio de Janeiro’s Tijuca Forest National Park has managed something no other favela has done: built its own biosystem to process its waste. The project could serve as an example in rural areas across Brazil, where many lack access to sewage treatment facilities. The federal government has a plan to improve sewage treatment throughout Brazil, which it is pursuing through private concessions of large urban areas. But that approach doesn’t help small, isolated communities like Enchanted Valley, where the smell of sewage is now gone and its nearby waterfall is clean for bathing.

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“All men are created equal.” Few words in American history are invoked as often as the preamble to the Declaration of Independence, published nearly 250 years ago. And are few more difficult to define. The music, and the economy, of “all men are created equal” make it both universal and elusive — and adaptable to viewpoints otherwise with little or no common ground. How we use them often depends less on how we came into this world than on what kind world we want to live in. It’s as if “All men are created equal” leads Americans to ask: “And then what?”

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The Supreme Court's decision eliminating the constitutional right to abortion is causing anxiety for people in same-sex marriages, particularly those with children. The decision last week overturning Roe v. Wade didn't directly affect the 2015 ruling that paved the way for gay marriage. But lawyers say now they're getting questions from same-sex couples worried about the legal status of their marriages and keeping their children. Alabama lawyer Sydney Duncan has received dozens of emails and calls in just a few days. Justice Clarence Thomas has called on colleagues to reconsider cases that allowed same-sex marriage, gay sex and contraception.

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Families of the more than 60 people packed into a tractor-trailer and abandoned in Texas have began to confirm their worst fears. And a common narrative is taking shape from Honduras to Mexico: people seeking a better life. Children hoping to earn enough to support their parents. Young adults who had hoped college would lead to success left their country disillusioned. A man already working in the U.S. decided to take a cousin on his return from a trip to his homeland. More than 50 of those migrants left in the sweltering heat on the outskirts of San Antonio have died, while others remain hospitalized.

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A year after migrants started crossing into the European Union from Belarus to Poland, Polish authorities will announce that the construction of a new steel wall along its border with Belarus has been finished. Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki will mark the completion of the wall with a visit to the border area on Thursday. The purpose of the wall is to keep out migrants fleeing conflict and poverty in the Middle East and Africa. On Friday, Polish authorities will also lift a state of emergency along the border that has made it impossible for journalists and human rights workers witness the human rights crisis in an area where at the very least 20 migrants have died.