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The Supreme Court says the Biden administration can scrap a Trump-era immigration policy that was at the center of efforts to deter asylum-seekers, forcing some to wait in Mexico. Two conservative justices joined their three liberal colleagues Thursday in siding with the White House. At issue was the “Remain in Mexico” policy under President Donald Trump. President Joe Biden suspended the program on his first day in office in January 2021. But lower courts ordered it reinstated in response to a lawsuit from Republican-led Texas and Missouri. The current administration has sent far fewer people back to Mexico than did the Trump administration.

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Abortion-rights activists demonstrate against the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade that established a constitutional right to abortion, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 30, 2022. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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FILE - Emissions from a coal-fired power plant are silhouetted against the setting sun in Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 1, 2021. The Supreme Court on Thursday, June 30, 2022, limited how the nation’s main anti-air pollution law can be used to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. By a 6-3 vote, with conservatives in the majority, the court said that the Clean Air Act does not give the Environmental Protection Agency broad authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants that contribute to global warming. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

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The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a North Carolina case that could dramatically change the way elections for Congress and the presidency are conducted. The case could ultimately hand more power to state legislatures and block state courts from reviewing challenges to the procedures and results. The justices will consider whether state courts, finding violations of their state constitutions, can order changes to federal elections and the once-a-decade redrawing of congressional districts. The case, an appeal from North Carolina Republicans, challenges a state court ruling throwing out the congressional districts drawn by the state’s General Assembly that made GOP candidates likely victors in 10 of the state’s 14 congressional districts.

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FILE - Members of the Supreme Court pose for a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington, April 23, 2021. Seated from left are Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer and Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left are Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh, Associate Justice Elena Kagan, Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch and Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

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FILE - President Donald Trump watches as Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas administers the Constitutional Oath to Amy Coney Barrett on the South Lawn of the White House White House in Washington, Oct. 26, 2020. Holding the Bible is Barrett's husband, Jesse Barrett. Eight of the last nine Republican nominees to be confirmed to the Supreme Court, from the Reagan to the Trump presidencies, have had Catholic pedigrees including Barrett. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

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FILE - Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito testifies before the House Appropriations Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 7, 2019. In Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, five justices voted to overturn Roe — Samuel Alito, Amy Coney Barrett, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Clarence Thomas. All five were raised Catholic. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

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FILE - Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh stands during a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington, on April 23, 2021. In Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, five justices voted to overturn Roe — Samuel Alito, Amy Coney Barrett, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Clarence Thomas. All five were raised Catholic. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

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FILE - Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas sits during a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington, April 23, 2021. In Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, five justices voted to overturn Roe — Samuel Alito, Amy Coney Barrett, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Clarence Thomas. All five were raised Catholic. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

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FILE - Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch stands during a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington, April 23, 2021. In Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, five justices voted to overturn Roe — Samuel Alito, Amy Coney Barrett, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Clarence Thomas. All five were raised Catholic. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool)