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CONCORD, N.H. (AP) _ These Maine lotteries were drawn Wednesday:

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CONCORD, N.H. (AP) _ These New Hampshire lotteries were drawn Wednesday:

AP
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Somalia is in the midst of the worst drought anyone there can remember. More than 1 million have fled. A rare famine declaration could be made within weeks. Climate change and fallout from the war in Ukraine are in part to blame. Thousands of people have died, many of them children. The Associated Press visited displacement camps where many people had received little to no food aid. Several gave rare accounts of living under the control of the al-Shabab extremist group that has prevented most aid from coming in and many people from leaving. The drought has astonished herders and farmers by lasting four failed rainy seasons, starting two years ago. The fifth is underway and likely will fail too.

AP

North Korea has launched two ballistic missiles into its eastern waters after the U.S. redeployed an aircraft carrier in response to the North’s earlier launch of a nuclear-capable missile over Japan. Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said North Korea’s continued launches were “absolutely intolerable.” The launches Tuesday were North Korea’s sixth round of weapons tests in less than two weeks, adding to a record number of missile launches this year that has been condemned by the United States and other countries. Thursday’s launches came as the U.S. aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan returned to waters east of South Korea.

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A super app called X? A bot-free free speech haven? These are some of Elon Musk’s mysterious plans for Twitter, now that he may be moving toward buying the company after all. After months of squabbling over the fate of their bombshell $44 billion deal, the billionaire and the bird app are essentially back to square one — if a bit worse for wear as trust and goodwill has seemed to erode on both sides.

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Widespread drought that dried up large parts of Europe, the United States and China this past summer was made 20 times more likely by climate change, according to a new study. Researchers from World Weather Attribution, a group of scientists around the world who study the link between extreme weather and climate change, say this type of drought would only hit the Northern Hemisphere once every 400 years, if not for human-caused climate change. Now droughts like this are likely hit once every 20 years. With additional warming, expected by many climate scientists, these types of droughts could come every year.

AP
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This year’s Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to Americans Carolyn R. Bertozzi and K. Barry Sharpless, and Danish scientist Morten Meldal for developing a way of “snapping molecules together" that can be used to design better medicines. They were cited for their work on click chemistry, which has been used to make cancer drugs, map DNA and create materials that are tailored to a specific purpose. Hans Ellegren, secretary general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, announced the winners Wednesday at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

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Democratic Sens. Dick Durbin and Tammy Duckworth are urging the Education Department to strengthen regulations against excluding kids from class because of behaviors related to a disability — a practice known as informal removal. Since the pandemic began, parents of kids with disabilities say the practice is on the rise, denying their kids their legal right to an education. In a report Tuesday, The Associated Press and The Hechinger Report documented the impact of these informal removals on children and families. In interviews with 20 families in 10 states, parents said they were called repeatedly to pick up their children. Some said they left work so frequently they lost their jobs.

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A Russian cosmonaut has rocketed from the U.S. for the first time in 20 years, catching a ride with SpaceX. She launched to the International Space Station from Florida on Wednesday alongside two NASA astronauts and one from Japan. Their flight was delayed a couple days by Hurricane Ian. Leading the crew is Nicole Mann, the first Native American woman orbit Earth. She says despite their different backgrounds and the war in Ukraine, she and her crewmates are united in their mission. They should reach the orbiting lab Thursday for a five-month stay.