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The Supreme Court's decision eliminating the constitutional right to abortion is causing anxiety for people in same-sex marriages, particularly those with children. The decision last week overturning Roe v. Wade didn't directly affect the 2015 ruling that paved the way for gay marriage. But lawyers say now they're getting questions from same-sex couples worried about the legal status of their marriages and keeping their children. Alabama lawyer Sydney Duncan has received dozens of emails and calls in just a few days. Justice Clarence Thomas has called on colleagues to reconsider cases that allowed same-sex marriage, gay sex and contraception.

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Sydney Duncan, an attorney who specializes in representing LGBTQ people, speaks during an interview in Birmingham, Ala., on Monday, June 27, 2022. The Supreme Court's decision eliminating the constitutional right to abortion is causing anxiety for people in same-sex marriages, particularly those with children. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)

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Sydney Duncan, an attorney who specializes in representing LGBTQ people, speaks during an interview in Birmingham, Ala., on Monday, June 27, 2022. The Supreme Court's decision eliminating the constitutional right to abortion is causing anxiety for people in same-sex marriages, particularly those with children. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)

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Alabama  is using the U.S. Supreme Court decision on abortion to argue that the state should also be able to ban gender-affirming medical treatments for transgender youth. The state is asking the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift an injunction against an Alabama law that would make it a felony to give puberty blockers or hormones to transgender minors to help affirm their gender identity. The case marks one of the first known instances in which a conservative state has tried to apply the abortion decision to other realms, just as LGBTQ advocates and others feared would happen.

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The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade at a time when it has an unprecedented Catholic supermajority. That’s not a coincidence. Nor is it the whole story. U.S. Catholics are more ambivalent on abortion than their church leaders. More than half say it should be legal in all or most circumstances. Catholics such as President Joe Biden and Justice Sonia Sotomayor wanted Roe upheld. But the justices who voted to overturn Roe have been shaped by intellectual, spiritual and social currents within Catholicism that are strongly conservative and anti-abortion. “They are particular kinds of Catholics, traveling in particular Catholic circles,” one scholar says.

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Last week Clarence Thomas achieved two long-sought goals: expanding gun rights and overturning Roe v. Wade’s nationwide protection for abortion. And he called on his colleagues to do more, to revisit the Supreme Court’s cases acknowledging rights to same-sex marriage, gay sex and contraception. After 30 years on the court, Thomas' influence has never been greater, and yet he remains a lightning rod for controversy. That includes recent questions about his wife’s role in attempting to overturn the results of the 2020 election and his decision not to recuse himself from cases that involved it. Thomas has given no indication the criticism bothers him, or that he’s going anywhere.

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The Supreme Court’s decision to overturn national protections for abortion has set off a contest between Democratic and Republican lawmakers over whose policies would do more to help vulnerable mothers and children. It's a key issue going into the midterm elections. Republicans such as Florida Sen. Rick Scott say that GOP lawmakers have the responsibility to “do everything in our power to meet the needs of struggling women and their families so they can choose life.” Democrats suggest their rivals are hypocrites who would offer half-measures at best and that voters should judge them accordingly.

Pride parades kicked off in some of America’s biggest cities Sunday amid new fears about the potential erosion of freedoms won through decades of activism. The annual marches in New York, San Francisco, Chicago and elsewhere take place after at least one Supreme Court justice signaled, in a ruling on abortion, that the court could reconsider the right to same-sex marriage recognized in 2015. That warning shot came after a year of legislative defeats for the LGBTQ community, including the passage of laws in some states limiting the discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity with children.

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A growing number of couples in Ukraine are speedily turning love into matrimony because of the war with Russia. Some are soldiers, marrying just before they head off to fight. Others are united in determination that living and loving to the full are more important than ever in the face of death and destruction. Ukraine’s war-time martial laws include a provision allowing Ukrainians, both soldiers and civilians, to apply and marry on the same day. In the Kyiv region alone, more than 4,000 couples have jumped at the expedited opportunity, seizing the day. One new husband proposed to his then-girlfriend in the opening hours of the Russian invasion. If death do us part, he figured, then let it be as husband and wife.

AP
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In Lebanon, a debate over civil marriages is mired in religious and political entanglements. The controversy has flared up anew after a few recently elected lawmakers raised their hands in approval when asked on television whether they would vote for “optional” civil marriage. That infuriated those insisting marriages here must remain under religious authorities’ purview. Many civil marriage proponents argue that the battle over how to say “I do” is part of a larger fight about increasing civil and personal rights, eroding the religious power within the country’s sectarian system and, ultimately, chipping away at the sectarian divides ingrained in politics and beyond. Opponents decry civil marriage as an affront to faith.