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In its third public hearing, the House panel investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection has focused on former President Donald Trump’s pressure on his vice president to delay or reject the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory. It has also attempted to show how that pressure incited an angry mob to break into the Capitol that day. Vice President Mike Pence presided over the certification in the vice president’s traditional ceremonial role, and did not give in to Trump’s pressure. Lawmakers on the nine-member panel, and the witnesses who testified at the hearing, all described Pence’s decision as having averted a constitutional crisis.

AP
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Major flooding has forced the evacuation of tens of thousands of people in southern China, with more rain expected. The manufacturing hub of Guangdong province suspended classes, office work and public transport amid rising waters and the threat of landslides. In the neighboring province of Jiangxi, almost 500,000 people have seen damage to their homes and their lives uprooted. Roughly the same number have been affected in Guangdong. The heavy rainfall has collapsed roads in some parts of cities and swept away houses, cars and crops. China regularly experiences flooding during the summer months, most frequently in central and southern areas that tend to receive the most rainfall.

AP
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Authorities in India and Bangladesh are struggling to deliver food and drinking water to hundreds of thousands of people evacuated from their homes in days of flooding that have submerged wide swaths of the countries. The floods triggered by monsoon rains have killed more than a dozen people, marooned millions and flooded millions of houses. In northeastern Bangladesh, villagers waded through streets flooded up to their knees. Local TV said millions remained without electricity. Flooding also ravaged India’s northeastern Assam state, where two policemen involved in rescue operations were washed away by floodwaters. Officials say about 200,000 people are taking shelter in 700 relief camps. Water in all major rivers in the state is above danger levels.

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Firefighters in Spain and Germany area struggling to contain wildfires amid an unusual heat wave in Western Europe for this time of year. Authorities say the worst damage in Spain has been in the northwest province of Zamora where over 25,000 hectares (61,000 acres) have been consumed. German officials said that residents of three villages near Berlin were ordered to leave their homes because of an approaching wildfire Sunday. Spanish authorities warned there was still danger that an unfavorable shift in weather could revive the blaze that caused the evacuation of 18 villages.

Yellowstone National Park officials say more than 10,000 visitors have been ordered out of the nation’s oldest national park after unprecedented flooding tore through its northern half, washing out bridges and roads and sweeping an employee bunkhouse miles downstream. Remarkably, no one was reported injured or killed. Superintendent Cam Sholly said Tuesday the only visitors left in the massive park straddling three states were a dozen campers still making their way out of the backcountry. Sholly says the park could remain closed as long as a week, and northern entrances may not reopen this summer.

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Flooding has wiped out roads and bridges and closed off all entrances to Yellowstone National Park at the onset of the busy summer tourist season. Officials are evacuating visitors from the northern part of the park. And the flooding has cut off road access to Gardiner, a town of about 900 people near Yellowstone’s busy North Entrance. The flooding caused at least one rock slide, cut off electricity and imperiled water and sewer systems in northern Yellowstone, but has affected other areas of the park as well. Flooding also has hit the Yellowstone gateway communities of Red Lodge and Joliet in southern Montana.

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Wildfires burning throughout the American West are forcing evacuations as crews deal with more hot, windy and dry conditions. Residents were ordered to flee remote homes near a wildfire in the mountains northeast of Los Angeles. In Arizona, firefighters are battling a wildfire on the northern outskirts of Flagstaff that has forced evacuations in the same area as another springtime blaze. Firefighters in New Mexico are battling some of the nation's largest blazes in tinder dry forests. Federal officials say the number of acres burned nationwide so far this year is more than double the 10-year average.

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President Joe Biden is focusing on his administration’s efforts to tackle wildfires during his visit later Saturday visit to New Mexico. Residents are enraged that federal officials allowed planned burns to spread out of control, leading to the largest blaze in recorded state history. The fire has been contained on several fronts, but is still burning and conditions are dangerously hot and dry. Federal officials say it has destroyed more than 430 homes across 500 square miles since early April. Evacuations have displaced thousands of residents  while causing untold environmental damage. Fear of flames is giving way to concern about erosion and mudslides in places where superheated fire penetrated soil and roots.

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President Joe Biden says Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy “didn’t want to hear it” when U.S. intelligence gathered information that Russia was preparing to invade. Speaking to donors at a Democratic fundraiser in Los Angeles, made the remarks as he talked about his work to rally support for Ukraine as the war continues into its fourth month. “Nothing like this has happened since World War II. I know a lot of people thought I was maybe exaggerating. But I knew we had data to sustain he” — meaning Russian President Vladimir Putin — “was going to go in, off the border.”

AP
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Volunteer drivers are risking everything to deliver humanitarian aid to Ukrainians behind the front lines of the war — and to help many of them escape. The routes are dangerous and long and the drivers risk detention, injury or death. Ukrainian activists say more than two dozen drivers have been detained and held for more than two months by Russian-backed separatists in the Donetsk region. In Donetsk and the Luhansk region, vans and minibuses of volunteers zip through towns and down country roads, racing to evacuate civilians as artillery shells whistle through the air. Russian forces are doubling down on their offensive in the regions.