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Medication abortions were the preferred method for ending pregnancy in the U.S. even before the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. As more states seek abortion limits, demand is expected to grow. They involve using two prescription medicines days apart _ pills that can be taken at home or in a clinic. The drug mifepristone is taken first. It blocks the effects of the hormone progesterone, which is needed to sustain a pregnancy. Misoprostol is taken 24 to 48 hours later. It cause the womb to contract, expelling the pregnancy. Use of the pills has been increasing in recent years.

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The Texas Supreme Court has blocked a lower court order that had given some abortion clinics confidence to resume performing abortions. The order handed down Friday night by the state’s highest court comes just days after some abortion providers rushed to resume services. An lower court order issued this week by a Houston judge had reassured some doctors they could temporarily resume abortions up to six weeks into pregnancy. Before that, doctors across Texas had stopped performing abortions in the state after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and ended the constitutional right to abortion.

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Arizona’s Republican attorney general says a total ban on abortions that has been on the books since before statehood can be enforced. Attorney General Mark Brnovich's decision puts him at odds with GOP Gov. Doug Ducey, who says a 15-week abortion ban he signed in March takes precedence. Also Wednesday, Louisiana’s attorney general is warning doctors against performing abortions, despite a judge’s order blocking the state from enforcing its ban on the procedure. Attorney General Jeff Landry said that the state judge’s Monday order blocking enforcement “has limited reach” and that abortion remains a crime in Louisiana after Friday’s Supreme Court decision ending abortion rights. That decision has prompted legal fights in multiple states.

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The Supreme Court's ruling allowing states to regulate abortion has set off a travel scramble in some parts of the U.S.,  as abortion providers redirect patients to states that still allow the procedure. A growing number of states are moving to mostly banning abortion. Clinics operators are moving, doctors are counseling crying patients, donations are pouring into nonprofits and one group is dispatching vans to administer abortion pills. Some cities _ like Kansas City and St. Louis _ also are drafting plans to help with the travel logistics. Groups are trying to help with everything from gas cards for travel to connecting patients with small aircraft pilots willing to transport them to a clinic in another state.

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South Dakota’s Republican governor is pledging to bar mail-order abortion pills but says women shouldn't face prosecution for seeking them. Kristi Noem's stand appears to be in defiance of legal guidance by the Justice Department after the Supreme Court last week stripped away women’s constitutional protections for abortion. The governor is indicating that she'd put in place a plan approved by state lawmakers to restrict the abortion pills. The ruling Friday by the court’s conservative justices triggered abortion bans in South Dakota and elsewhere. But Noem says in news show interviews that doctors, not their patients, would likely be prosecuted for knowing violations of what would be one of the strictest laws on abortion pills in the United States.

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The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. Friday's ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

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The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision allowing states to ban abortion is stirring alarm among LGBTQ advocates. They fear that the ruling could someday allow a rollback of legal protections for gay relationships, including the right for same-sex couples to marry. In the majority opinion issued Friday that overturns the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, Justice Samuel Alito said the decision applied only to abortion. But critics discounted that statement. In a separate concurring opinion, Justice Clarence Thomas said the court should review other precedents, including decisions legalizing same-sex marriage and striking down laws criminalizing gay sex. A protester at a Topeka, Kansas, abortion-rights rally said conservatives would not stop with abortion.

AP
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The right-wing government in Poland, where a near-total abortion ban is in place, now faces accusations it is creating a “pregnancy register.” Poland is expanding the amount of medical data being saved digitally on patients to include pregnancies, blood type and allergies. Critics fear that women will face new a type of surveillance due to that data in the state health system. They say the data could be used by police and prosecutors against women whose pregnancies end, even in miscarriages, or that women could be tracked by the state if they seek to order abortion pills or travel abroad for an abortion. Poland’s conservative ruling party has tightened what was already one of Europe’s most restrictive abortion laws.