Search / 11 results found

from
to
  • Updated

Social media users shared a range of false claims this week. Here are the facts: A 2019 amendment to a Kentucky abortion law was proposed as satire and not seriously considered. A Department of Defense statement issued after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade did not say the Pentagon would defy the ruling, nor did it say it would violate any state laws on the matter. Pallets of bricks pictured on a Washington, D.C., street were for ongoing construction, not to incite rioting. Research at a Tennessee laboratory studied neutron activity, not a portal to a parallel universe.

  • Updated

Los Angeles and Mumbai, India, are the world’s only megacities of 10 million-plus people where large felines breed, hunt and maintain territory within urban boundaries. Long-term studies in both cities have examined how the big cats prowl through their urban jungles and how people can best live alongside them. Scientists in India recently fitted five leopards with tracking collars to understand how they use territory around Sanjay Gandhi National Park. In Los Angeles, research showing how harmful a fragmented habitat and risks of inbreeding would be for mountain lions fueled support for building a wildlife crossing bridge over a busy freeway.

AP
  • Updated

The marine area off the coast of Kenya at Wasini Island, jointly managed by a foundation and the island’s community, has been planting over 8,000 corals a year since 2012 and placed about 800 artificial reef structures in the channel in a bid to restore Wasini’s coral gardens. But the project is threatened by growing costs and a planned fishing port in Shimoni, a mere 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) away on Kenya’s coast. The United Nation’s Oceans Conference, which begins Monday in Lisbon, Portugal, is set to put protection and restoration efforts for coral reefs back on the agenda.

AP
  • Updated

Villagers see destruction everywhere and help in short supply days after an earthquake devastated a remote region of southeast Afghanistan and killed at least 1,150 people by authorities' estimates. Those who were barely scraping by have lost everything. Many have yet to be visited by aid groups, which are struggling to reach the afflicted area on rutted roads. There are fears that help will come too late to the impoverished provinces of Paktika and Khost that straddle the country’s border with Pakistan. Aware of its constraints, the cash-strapped Taliban have called for foreign assistance. China joined countries in pledging nearly $7.5 million in aid. But the relief effort remains patchy for the latest calamity to convulse the country.

  • Updated

The White House is launching a partnership with 11 East Coast governors to boost the growing offshore wind industry, a key element of President Joe Biden’s climate change plan. Biden administration officials will meet with governors and labor leaders Thursday to announce commitments to expand important parts of the offshore industry. Those parts include manufacturing facilities, ports and workforce training and development. The Democratic president has a goal of deploying enough offshore wind power by 2030 to provide electricity to 10 million homes and support 77,000 jobs. The governors are from Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island.

  • Updated

A federal jury has awarded $650,000 in damages to a Massachusetts construction worker who said his employer retaliated against him after he was injured on the job by sparking an immigration investigation that led to his arrest. The jury Tuesday ordered Tara Construction and its owner to pay the compensation to José Martin Paz Flores, referred to as Paz in court documents. The U.S. Department of Labor sued on behalf of Paz in March 2019, alleging the company retaliated against the worker because he was in the U.S. illegally, which is a violation of federal law. The company is considering an appeal.

  • Updated

Yellowstone National Park is celebrating its 150th anniversary as it faces its biggest challenge in decades. Floodwaters that tore through the park this week destroyed potentially hundreds of bridges, washed out miles of roads and drove out more than 10,000 visitors. The scope of the damage is still being tallied by Yellowstone officials, but based on other national park disasters, it could take years and cost upwards of $1 billion to rebuild in an environmentally sensitive landscape. Park officials hope to reopen the southern half of the park next week but the northern half likely won't reopen this year.

  • Updated

Federal officials say most of Yellowstone National Park should reopen within the next two weeks. Record floods pounded the region last week and knocked out major roads. Yellowstone's superintendent said the park will be able to accommodate fewer visitors for the time being, and it will take many months to re-connect the world-renowned park's roads with some southern Montana communities. Yellowstone will partially reopen at 8 a.m. Wednesday. Only portions of the park that can be accessed along its “southern loop” of roads will be opened initially and access to the park’s scenic backcountry will be for day hikers only. Within two weeks officials plan to also open the northern loop.

  • Updated

With Yellowstone National Park pushing to re-open to tourists more quickly than anticipated after record floods pounded southern Montana, some of those hardest hit in the disaster live far from the famous park’s limelight and are leaning heavily on one another to pull their lives out of the mud. In the farming town of Fromberg, the Clarks Fork River flooded almost 100 homes and badly damaged a major irrigation ditch that serves many of the farms. The town’s mayor says about a third of the flooded homes can’t be repaired. Resident Lindi O'Brien says if the town is going to recover, its 400 people will have to do much of the work themselves.

  • Updated

Inflation is taking a toll on infrastructure projects across the U.S. Rising prices for materials such as asphalt, steel and iron pipes are driving up the costs to build roads, bridges, rail lines and water mains. The prices for some infrastructure materials have risen even faster than general consumer prices. State and local officials say inflation is diminishing the value of a $1 trillion federal infrastructure law signed by President Joe Biden just seven months ago. Some officials say inflation has forced them to delay or scale back the scope of projects.