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Los Angeles and Mumbai, India, are the world’s only megacities of 10 million-plus people where large felines breed, hunt and maintain territory within urban boundaries. Long-term studies in both cities have examined how the big cats prowl through their urban jungles and how people can best live alongside them. Scientists in India recently fitted five leopards with tracking collars to understand how they use territory around Sanjay Gandhi National Park. In Los Angeles, research showing how harmful a fragmented habitat and risks of inbreeding would be for mountain lions fueled support for building a wildlife crossing bridge over a busy freeway.

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Federal officials say most of Yellowstone National Park should reopen within the next two weeks. Record floods pounded the region last week and knocked out major roads. Yellowstone's superintendent said the park will be able to accommodate fewer visitors for the time being, and it will take many months to re-connect the world-renowned park's roads with some southern Montana communities. Yellowstone will partially reopen at 8 a.m. Wednesday. Only portions of the park that can be accessed along its “southern loop” of roads will be opened initially and access to the park’s scenic backcountry will be for day hikers only. Within two weeks officials plan to also open the northern loop.

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With Yellowstone National Park pushing to re-open to tourists more quickly than anticipated after record floods pounded southern Montana, some of those hardest hit in the disaster live far from the famous park’s limelight and are leaning heavily on one another to pull their lives out of the mud. In the farming town of Fromberg, the Clarks Fork River flooded almost 100 homes and badly damaged a major irrigation ditch that serves many of the farms. The town’s mayor says about a third of the flooded homes can’t be repaired. Resident Lindi O'Brien says if the town is going to recover, its 400 people will have to do much of the work themselves.

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Inflation is taking a toll on infrastructure projects across the U.S. Rising prices for materials such as asphalt, steel and iron pipes are driving up the costs to build roads, bridges, rail lines and water mains. The prices for some infrastructure materials have risen even faster than general consumer prices. State and local officials say inflation is diminishing the value of a $1 trillion federal infrastructure law signed by President Joe Biden just seven months ago. Some officials say inflation has forced them to delay or scale back the scope of projects.