Search / 40 results found

from
to
  • Updated

A copy of what’s being called Stephen Sondheim’s first original cast recording has been found on a misplaced CD, capturing the legendary composer’s budding skills in a student-led musical while at Williams College in 1948. Sondheim was an 18-year-old sophomore when he wrote the music for “Phinney’s Rainbow,” a show that had just four performances sponsored by Williams’ theatrical organization Cap and Bells. Paul Salsini, the author of the new memoir “Sondheim & Me: Revealing a Musical Genius,” recently found the CD while putting away material he had amassed for his book and realized it contained “Sondheim’s first original cast recording.”

  • Updated

Thrifting is hot, and Goodwill finds are cool again. But while we’re thrilled to find the perfect throwback tee for our own closet, gifting used goods still carries a stigma for some. It shouldn’t. Secondhand gifts are better for your wallet, your community and the environment. Buying a thrifted sweatshirt, jacket or vase keeps it from landing in a heap at the dump. And even with rising prices, buying secondhand is almost always less expensive than buying new. Most vintage shops and thrift stores are small businesses or nonprofit organizations, too, so gifts purchased there contribute to local jobs, businesses and community causes.

  • Updated

A new book from the owner of a New Orleans craft cocktail bar is showing readers an elegant look at cocktails in a city known for drinking excess. Neal Bodenheimer founded Cure in 2009 and since then has gone on to open other bars and restaurants. His new book is titled “Cure: New Orleans Drinks and How to Mix ’Em." It showcases drinks created by Cure staff and well-known New Orleans drink staples such as the Sazerac or the Ramos Gin Fizz. The book includes essays about the city and its drinking culture. Bodenheimer says the book is a “love letter to the city from me.”

  • Updated

FILE - Jozef Pilsudski, the father of Polish independence in 1918, sits for a portrait on March 19, 1932, in Warsaw, Poland. More than 100 years ago, Pilsudski stated that the long-term security of Europe would need an independent Ukraine, according to a new biography of the Polish leader. The biography, “Józef Pilsudski Founding Father of Modern Poland” by Joshua D. Zimmerman is published by Harvard University Press. (AP Photo, File)

  • Updated

This cover image released by Harvard University Press shows "Jozef Pilsudski Founding Father of Modern Poland" by Joshua D. Zimmerman. (Harvard University Press via AP)

  • Updated

FILE - Polish dictator and military leader Marshal Jozef Pilsudski reviews troops in Warsaw on Nov. 5, 1927. Farsighted, analytical and determined, Pilsudski never managed to fulfill his hope for a Ukraine independent of Russia and connected to Europe. But he did, improbably, wrest his own homeland from the grip of tsarism and from Austria and Prussia. His story is the subject of a new biography, “Józef Pilsudski Founding Father of Modern Poland” by Joshua D. Zimmerman. (AP Photo, File)

  • Updated

A sweeping novel set in a low-income housing community in Indiana, Tess Gunty’s “The Rabbit Hutch” has won the National Book Award for fiction. On Wednesday night, the nonfiction prize went to Imani Perry’s “South to America,” and Sabaa Tahir’s “All My Rage” won for young people’s literature. In poetry, John Keene was cited for “Punks: New and Selected Poems,″ while Argentine-Spanish language author Samanta Schweblin and translator Megan McDowell won for best work in translation for “Seven Empty Houses.” Winners each received $10,000.

  • Updated

This combination of book cover images shows National Book Award winners, from left, "The Rabbit Hutch" by Tess Gunty, "South to America: A Journey Below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation" by Imani Perry, "All My Rage" by Sabaa Tahir, and "Punks: New & Selected Poems" by John Keene. (Knopf/Ecco/Razorbill/The Song Cave via AP)