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In this photo provided by the University of Arizona and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a male jaguar photographed by motion-detection wildlife cameras in the Santa Rita Mountains in Arizona on April 30, 2015 as part of a Citizen Science jaguar monitoring project conducted by the University of Arizona, in coordination with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. According to Borderlands Linkages, a binational collaboration of eight conservation groups, this cat is known as “El Jefe,” or “The Boss,“ is one of the oldest jaguars on record along the border and one of few known to have crossed the border. (University of Arizona and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)

AP
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French environmentalists are preparing to move a beluga whale that strayed into the Seine River last week to a saltwater basin in the Normandy region. The president of the conservation group Sea Shepherd France said Tuesday that a medical team plans to transport the 4-meter-long (13-foot-long) whale to a coastal spot for “a period of care.” Experts think the whale is sick and in a race against time for survival. Conservations groups said it would take 24 people to load the beluga into a refrigerated truck for the approximately 160-kilometer (99-mile) nighttime trip to the northeastern French port town of Ouistreham.

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The birds no longer sing. The cows die. And if the people in this northern Myanmar forest complain, they too face the threat of death from militias. This forest is the source of key metallic elements known as rare earths, often called the vitamins of the modern world. Rare earths turn up in everything from hard drives to elevators, and are vital to the fast-growing field of green energy. But an AP investigation found their cost is environmental destruction, the theft of land and the funneling of money to brutal militias. The AP tied rare earths from Myanmar to the supply chains of 78 companies. Nearly all who responded said they took environmental protection and human rights seriously.

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The Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers are central arms of California's water system. But they are becoming too salty to use for some farmers and cities that rely on them as the state's punishing drought drags on. In dry times, less fresh water flows from the mountains through California's rivers and into an estuary known as the Delta. That means saltier water from the Pacific Ocean is able to push further into the system, which supplies water to millions of people and acres of farmland. The Delta's challenges foreshadow the risks to come for key water supplies from drought and sea level rise made worse by climate change.

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New research suggests that jumping spiders show signs of sleep cycles, similar to humans and some animals. Scientists trained cameras on baby jumping spiders to find out what happened during the night. The footage showed patterns: Their legs twitched and parts of their eyes flickered. In a study published Monday, the researchers described this pattern as a “REM sleep-like state.” In humans, REM, or rapid eye movement, is an active phase of sleep when parts of the brain light up with activity. Some animals have been shown to experience REM sleep. But creatures like the jumping spider haven’t been studied very much.

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A new study finds climate hazards aggravate 58% of known infection diseases in people. Monday's study shows how widespread the influence of extreme weather such as flooding, heat waves and drought is on human illnesses. The study looks at cases that already happened. Researchers calculate 286 unique sicknesses connected to what they call climate hazards. And of those illnesses, extreme weather made it worse in 223 maladies. The study doesn't do the calculations to formally attribute the diseases to climate change. But several scientists call it a terrifying illustration of climate change's effect on human health.

AP
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In this image, taken Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022 by environmental group Sea Shepherd, shows a Beluga whale in the Seine river in Notre Dame de la Garenne, west of Paris. French environmentalists said Monday efforts to feed a dangerously thin Beluga whale that has strayed into the Seine River have failed so far. Experts are now seeking ways to get the animal out of the river lock where it is now stuck. (Sea Shepherd via AP)

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Natalia Popova, 50, pets a tiger at her animal shelter in Kyiv region, Ukraine, Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022. Popova, in cooperation with the animal protection organisation UA Animals, has already saved more than 300 animals from the war, 200 of them were sent abroad, and 100 found a home in most western regions of Ukraine, which are considered to be safer. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

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California firefighters made gains against the state’s deadliest and largest wildfire of the year jut as an entire eastern Washington town was being evacuated because of a blaze that was burning homes. At about 1:30 p.m. the Adams County Sheriff’s Office said on Facebook that about 10 homes in Lind had burned.  Homes, infrastructure and crops were threatened. Lind is a community of about 500 people approximately 75 miles (121 kilometers) southwest of Spokane. In California, forecasters warned Thursday that spiking temperatures and plunging humidity levels could create conditions for further wildfire growth.

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A new video game sensation that features an adventurous feline has resonated with cat lovers and some of them are using the game to raise money for real cats. The game called “Stray” from Annapurna Interactive launched in July. Gamers are playing the game live and using online fundraising platforms to benefit cat rescue and adoption organizations. The company also partnered with two shelters to raffle off copies of the game. Brendan Gepson of the Nebraska Humane Society said they raised $7,000 through the raffle and many of the donors were new to them. He said the whole culture of the game is about a love of cats.