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Tuesday marks the first-ever U.S. auction for leases to develop commercial-scale floating wind farms in the deep waters off the West Coast. The live, online auction for the five leases — three off California’s central coast and two off its northern coast — has attracted strong interest — 43 companies from around the world. It marks America’s first foray into floating wind turbines; auctions so far have been for ones that are anchored to the seafloor. The need for energy that does not put more carbon into the atmosphere is increasing as climate change takes a toll. Environmentalists and tribes say they want to make sure the offshore and coastal development is done right.

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Nebraska agriculture officials say another 1.8 million chickens must be killed after bird flu was found on a farm. It's the latest sign that the outbreak has kept spreading after having already prompted the slaughter of more than 50 million birds nationwide. The Nebraska Department of Agriculture said Saturday that the state's 13th case of bird flu was found on an egg-laying farm in northeast Nebraska's Dixon County. All the chickens on the Nebraska farm are being killed to limit the spread of the disease. Officials say the virus presents little risk to human health because human cases are extremely rare and infected birds aren't allowed into the nation's food supply.

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FILE - Chickens walk in a fenced pasture at an organic farm in Iowa on Oct. 21, 2015. Nebraska agriculture officials say another 1.8 million chickens must be killed after bird flu was found on a farm in the latest sign that the outbreak that has already prompted the slaughter of more than 50 million birds nationwide continues to spread. Nebraska is second only to Iowa’s 15.5 million birds killed with 6.8 million birds now affected at 13 farms. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

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American consumers and nearly every industry will be affected if freight trains grind to a halt next month. One of the biggest rail unions rejected its deal Monday over concerns about demanding schedules and the lack of paid sick time. The U.S. hasn't seen an extended rail strike in a century. Many businesses only have a few days’ worth of raw materials and space for finished goods. If a strike goes past a few days, makers of food, fuel, cars and chemicals would all feel the squeeze, as would their customers. That’s not to mention the commuters who would be left stranded because many passenger railroads use tracks owned by the freight railroads.

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A federal judge has ruled that new lobster fishing restrictions designed to conserve rare whales will be delayed until 2024 to give the government time to design them. The ruling Thursday by a U.S. district judge came on the heels of his July ruling that new, stronger rules are needed to protect the North Atlantic right whale from extinction. The whales are vulnerable to entanglement in fishing gear. The judge previously ruled that fishing restrictions issued by the National Marine Fisheries Service didn't go far enough to protect the whales. He ruled this week that the agency must issue new rules by December 2024.

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An international nonprofit organization that sets sustainability standards for commercial fishing management has suspended a certification it awarded Maine’s lobster industry over concerns about harm to whales. Representatives for the London-based Marine Stewardship Council said Wednesday that the suspension of the Gulf of Maine lobster fishery’s certificate will go into effect on Dec. 15. MSC’s decision to take away its certification from the U.S. lobster fishery represents the second time a sustainability organization has downgraded the industry’s status this year.  Seafood Watch of California placed the fishery on a red list in late summer.

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The struggle for affordable housing is playing out in Vail, Colorado, where the owners of a ski resort are trying to create an affordable housing complex for the chefs, bus drivers, ski lift operators and other workers who keep the resort humming. The problem? A group of bighorn sheep live on a fraction of the land designated for the project. The years-long dispute is nowhere close to being solved, and it's leading local businesses to have a tough time recruiting workers to keep local businesses afloat.

The struggle for affordable housing is playing out in Vail, Colorado, where the owners of a ski resort are trying to create an affordable housing complex for the chefs, bus drivers, ski lift operators and other workers who keep the resort humming. The problem? A group of bighorn sheep live on a fraction of the land designated for the project. The years-long dispute is nowhere close to being solved, and it’s leading local businesses to have a tough time recruiting workers to keep local businesses afloat.

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Environmental damage caused by Ukraine’s war is mounting, and experts warn of long-term health consequences for the population. Leaks and fires from Russian-targeted fuel depots are polluting the air and water. The World Wildlife Fund in Ukraine says more than 6 million people have limited or no access to clean water and more than 280,000 hectares (nearly 692,000 acres) of forests have been destroyed or felled. Ukraine’s Audit Chamber says the war has caused more than $37 billion in environmental damage. Hardest-hit areas are in the industrial eastern regions, where fighting has been going on since a separatist conflict began in 2014, but researchers and environmental activists say the damage has spread.

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Let’s talk about three glorious workhorses of the late-summer vegetable garden, farm stand or kitchen: tomatoes, corn and zucchini.

Anyone with a garden is working feverishly to make use of their tomatoes and zucchini, and anyone with access to a farmer’s market is likewise piling up those items, along with fresh sweet corn.