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A tiny Nevada toad at the center of a legal battle over a geothermal project has officially been declared an endangered species. U.S. wildlife officials had temporarily listed it on a rarely used emergency basis last spring. The Fish and Wildlife Service said in a formal rule published Friday that the Dixie Valley toad is at risk of extinction "primarily due to the approval and commencement of geothermal development” about 100 miles east of Reno. Other threats to the quarter-sized amphibian include groundwater pumping, agriculture, climate change, disease and predation from bullfrogs. The temporary listing in April marked only the second time in 20 years the agency had taken such emergency action.

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FILE - Chickens walk in a fenced pasture at an organic farm in Iowa on Oct. 21, 2015. Nebraska agriculture officials say another 1.8 million chickens must be killed after bird flu was found on a farm in the latest sign that the outbreak that has already prompted the slaughter of more than 50 million birds nationwide continues to spread. Nebraska is second only to Iowa’s 15.5 million birds killed with 6.8 million birds now affected at 13 farms. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

AP
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Like the rest of the Caribbean, Cuba is suffering from longer droughts, warmer waters, more intense storms, and higher sea levels because of climate change. The rainy season, already an obstacle to Cuban agricultural production, has gotten longer and wetter. Agriculture had been a bright spot in Cuba’s struggling economy. The socialist government has had a liberal hand with food producers, allowing them to pursue their interests more openly than others do. That's easier because Cuba has ample sun, water and soil, the basic ingredients for plants and feeding animals. But by changing the way nature functions in the Caribbean, climate change is tinkering with the raw elements of productivity.

AP
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Farmers move in a horse cart at dawn in Batabano, Cuba, Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Cuba is suffering from longer droughts, warmer waters, more intense storms, and higher sea levels because of climate change. The rainy season, already an obstacle to Cuban agricultural production, has gotten longer and wetter. (AP Photo/Ismael Francisco)

AP
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Agricultural workers clear weeds from a Malanga plantation in Batabano, Cuba, Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Cuba is suffering from longer droughts, warmer waters, more intense storms, and higher sea levels because of climate change. The rainy season, already an obstacle to Cuban agricultural production, has gotten longer and wetter. (AP Photo/Ismael Francisco)