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A judge has cleared the way for abortions to resume in Kentucky, temporarily blocking the state’s near-total ban on the procedure that was triggered by the Supreme Court ruling that overturned Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights groups fought for the ruling Thursday that pauses the 2019 Kentucky law for now. Under the so-called trigger provisions, abortions ended abruptly June 24 once the nation’s highest court ruled to end the federal constitutional protections for abortions. The Kentucky case reflects the battles being waged in courthouses around the country over whether pregnancies may be lawfully ended.

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Arizona’s Republican attorney general says a total ban on abortions that has been on the books since before statehood can be enforced. Attorney General Mark Brnovich's decision puts him at odds with GOP Gov. Doug Ducey, who says a 15-week abortion ban he signed in March takes precedence. Also Wednesday, Louisiana’s attorney general is warning doctors against performing abortions, despite a judge’s order blocking the state from enforcing its ban on the procedure. Attorney General Jeff Landry said that the state judge’s Monday order blocking enforcement “has limited reach” and that abortion remains a crime in Louisiana after Friday’s Supreme Court decision ending abortion rights. That decision has prompted legal fights in multiple states.

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The Supreme Court's ruling allowing states to regulate abortion has set off a travel scramble in some parts of the U.S.,  as abortion providers redirect patients to states that still allow the procedure. A growing number of states are moving to mostly banning abortion. Clinics operators are moving, doctors are counseling crying patients, donations are pouring into nonprofits and one group is dispatching vans to administer abortion pills. Some cities _ like Kansas City and St. Louis _ also are drafting plans to help with the travel logistics. Groups are trying to help with everything from gas cards for travel to connecting patients with small aircraft pilots willing to transport them to a clinic in another state.

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FILE - Diane Derzis, owner of the Jackson Women's Health Organization clinic in Jackson, Miss., pauses as she gathers her thoughts at a news conference on her reaction to the U.S. Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, Friday, June 24, 2022. The clinic is the only facility that performs abortions in the state. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

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A patient is escorted into the Jackson Women's Health Organization clinic compound by security officers and clinic escorts, in Jackson, Miss., Tuesday, June 28, 2022. The clinic is the only facility that performs abortions in the state. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

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A federal court has allowed Tennessee to ban abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancy. Texas is already enforcing a six-week ban, but a judge Tuesday temporarily blocked an even stricter decades-old law from taking effect. The moves embody a flurry of activity that was set off at courthouses across the country after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week and ruled that terminating a pregnancy is not a constitutional right. Roughly half the states are expected to prohibit or severely limit the procedure now that the high court has left it up to them.

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Judges have temporarily blocked abortion bans in Louisiana and Utah, while a federal court in South Carolina said a law sharply restricting the procedure would take effect there immediately. The decisions emerged as the battle over whether women may end pregnancies shifted from the nation’s highest court to courthouses around the country. The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision Friday to end constitutional protection for abortion opened the gates for a wave of litigation. One side sought quickly to put statewide bans into effect, and the other tried to stop or at least delay such measures. Much of Monday’s court activity focused on “trigger laws,” adopted in 13 states that were designed to take effect swiftly after the ruling.

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Hundreds of so-called crisis pregnancy centers are located across every state in the U.S. Now that the Supreme Court has ruled that states can make abortion illegal, experts say these centers are likely to redouble their efforts to persuade women not to end their pregnancies. The logistics work in their favor, since many women won’t have the legal option of abortion without leaving their state. Some 2,500 pregnancy centers are located across the country, while there are fewer than 800 abortion clinics. Often religiously affiliated, the anti-abortion centers are not licensed medical facilities and do not provide medical services such as pre- or post-natal care or other health care for uninsured women.

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The Very Rev. Kris Stubna, rector of St. Paul Cathedral Parish, preaches on the topic of abortion after the recent Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade during Mass at St. Paul Catholic Cathedral in Pittsburgh on Sunday, June 26, 2022. During his service, Stubna said the overturning of the nearly 50-year-old Roe v. Wade ruling was the result of prayers and efforts of many Catholics and others. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)

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Parishioners kneel as the Very Rev. Kris Stubna leads Mass at St. Paul Catholic Cathedral in Pittsburgh on Sunday, June 26, 2022. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)