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Brooke Davis, photographed Thursday, June 30, 2022 in McDonough, Ga., has been struggling with medical debt. Starting Friday, the three major U.S. credit reporting companies will stop counting paid medical debt on the reports that banks, potential landlords and others use to judge creditworthiness. The companies also will start giving people a year to resolve delinquent medical debt that has been sent to collections before reporting it — up from six months previously. (AP Photo/Ben Gray)

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Brooke Davis, photographed Thursday, June 30, 2022 in McDonough, Ga., has been struggling with medical debt. Starting Friday, the three major U.S. credit reporting companies will stop counting paid medical debt on the reports that banks, potential landlords and others use to judge creditworthiness. The companies also will start giving people a year to resolve delinquent medical debt that has been sent to collections before reporting it — up from six months previously. (AP Photo/Ben Gray)

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The U.S. Justice Department says it is investigating the New York Police Department's treatment of sex crime victims after receiving reports of deficiencies for more than a decade. Federal authorities announced the probe Thursday in a release, saying they will thoroughly review the department's Special Victims Division to gauge any pattern of gender-biased policing. Justice Department officials say they will be reaching out to community groups and the public to learn about their interactions with the division. U.S. Attorney Breon Peace says the NYPD has already taken steps to address concerns, but authorities want to ensure sex assault victims are treated fair in the future.

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In a blow to the fight against climate change, the Supreme Court has limited how the nation’s main anti-air pollution law can be used to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. By a 6-3 vote Thursday, with conservatives in the majority, the court said that the Clean Air Act does not give the Environmental Protection Agency broad authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants that contribute to global warming. The decision, environmental advocates, dissenting liberal justices and President Joe Biden said, was a major step in the wrong direction at a time of increasing environmental damage attributable to climate change and dire warnings about the future.

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Alabama  is using the U.S. Supreme Court decision on abortion to argue that the state should also be able to ban gender-affirming medical treatments for transgender youth. The state is asking the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift an injunction against an Alabama law that would make it a felony to give puberty blockers or hormones to transgender minors to help affirm their gender identity. The case marks one of the first known instances in which a conservative state has tried to apply the abortion decision to other realms, just as LGBTQ advocates and others feared would happen.

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Abortion-rights activists demonstrate against the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade that established a constitutional right to abortion, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 30, 2022. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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U.S. Attorney Breon Peace speaks to members of the media outside federal court, Wednesday, June 29, 2022, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Federal law enforcement is investigating the New York Police Department’s treatment of sex crime victims after concluding there is “significant justification” to do so and after receiving reports of deficiencies for more than a decade, prosecutors said Thursday. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

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Stocks fell in afternoon trading on Wall Street Thursday and are on track to cap off their worst quarter since the early days of the pandemic. The S&P 500 index gave up 0.3%, bringing its losses for the year to 20%. The benchmark index has been on a dismal streak that dragged it into a bear market earlier this month. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.8% and the Nasdaq fell 1%. Retailers and other companies that rely directly on consumer spending were posting some of the biggest losses, as they have all year. The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.98%.

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Three people have sent to prison after a gang-related shootout in a residential neighborhood of Providence, Rhode Island, last year that left nine people injured. State Attorney General Peter Neronha said Thursday that George Rios, Jordanny Britto and Reynaldo Rivera were sentenced Wednesday to at least 10 years behind bars after pleading guilty to charges including assault with a dangerous weapon with a criminal street gang enhancement and discharge of a firearm during a crime of violence. The cases against three other people involved in the shootout in May 2021 remain pending. More than 50 shots were fired.