Michael Reagan: Loving Trump's U.N. speech

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Donald Trump's speech to the United Nations on Tuesday was not just great, it was totally refreshing.

The president's address to the U.N. General Assembly was so perfect it almost made me forget all the horrible speeches his predecessor gave to that corrupt, bloated and anti-American body. For the first time in eight years the world saw an American president not spending half his time apologizing to the U.N. for our country's past, present and future.

President Obama's U.N. speeches always managed to make it sound like the United States was no different from Iran and North Korea. He'd say we're going to stop their evil, and we're also going to stop our evil, as if there was a moral equivalency between us and those inhuman hellholes. On Tuesday President Trump did not pussyfoot around or ignore the obvious threats the rogue regimes of North Korea and Iran pose to a peaceful planet. He blasted both countries, calling them out for violating "every principle on which the United Nations is based. They respect neither their own citizens nor the sovereign rights of their countries. "If the righteous many do not confront the wicked few," Trump said, "then evil will triumph. When decent people and nations become bystanders to history, the forces of destruction only gather power and strength."

Trump, being Trump, also said what needed to be said about North Korea's dictator Kim Jong Un and his missile program. Liberals and the media went ballistic over Trump branding Un as the "Rocket Man." As usual, the media, which themselves have called Un every name in the book, missed the strengths of Trump's speech and concentrated on what they thought was a politically incorrect gaffe or a presidential goof. But "Rocket Man" was brilliant. It was a way to mock and insult Un while giving him a public warning that if the U.S. is "forced to defend itself or its allies ... we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea."

The president got his U.N. speech 100 percent right. Unlike President Obama, who blamed America first, Trump always puts America first. He and his speechwriters also deftly explained to his unfriendly audience what he meant by "America First." He said as president of the United States he will always put his country's interests first, just as each of them would put their country's interests first. The U.N. rank and file apparently couldn't understand that idea, unfortunately, because most of them routinely put themselves first, not their own countries.

Listening to President Trump speak to the U.N. on Tuesday was a real treat — like listening to an American Bibi Netanyahu. Bibi himself recognized the resemblance, which is why the Israeli leader tweeted his praise for Mr. Trump: "In over 30 years in my experience with the U.N., I never heard a bolder or more courageous speech."

Bibi knows the U.N. and how to address it and its gaggle of bureaucrats and professional America-haters. When the Israeli leader goes before them he always tells them exactly what they need to hear, but there's one problem — no one ever listens.

It'd be really nice if the U.N. people were listening this time to Trump. It'd be nice if they'd react positively to his call for the U.N. to do what it was founded to do ' defend the sovereignty, security and prosperity of all peaceful countries and stand together against rogue nations like North Korea and Iran. But unfortunately, in the real world probably half of the U.N. people who come to New York are not coming to work for world peace and greater prosperity. They're coming to see their mistresses and rack up hundreds of unpaid parking tickets.

— Michael Reagan is the son of President Ronald Reagan, a political consultant, and the author of "The New Reagan Revolution" (St. Martin's Press). Send comments to Reagan@caglecartoons.com. Follow him on Twitter @reaganworld.

The opinions expressed by columnists do not necessarily reflect the views of the Bennington Banner.



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