Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. HISTORIC MEETING ON TAP IN HAVANA

The sit-down between Obama and Raul Castro may offer critical clues about whether the U.S. president's sharp U-turn in policy will pay lasting dividends.

2. NORTH KOREA FIRES SHORT-RANGE PROJECTILES INTO SEA

The continuation of weapon launches is an apparent response to ongoing South Korea-U.S. military drills it sees as a provocation.

3. WHAT A U.S. JUDGE IS URGING OBAMA TO DO

AP's Jeff Horwitz reports the jurist is urging the White House to protect from public disclosure federal court records involving the once-secret criminal history of a former Trump business partner.

4. HOW THIS CAUCUS IS DIFFERENT FROM OTHERS

Utah voters Tuesday will navigate a new online-voting system officials hope will boost turnout for the state's caucuses.

5. FEARS IN IRAQ OVER SHIITE MILITIAS' POWER

When the fighting is done against the Islamic State group, some in the military and government fear the forces will seek to dominate Iraq the way the Revolutionary Guard does Iran and Hezbollah does Lebanon.

6. MIXED REACTIONS TO TRUMP'S WALL ALONG ARIZONA BORDER

The plan stirs up emotions among voters who live here with some saying it would divide Mexico and the U.S. and others who say nothing short of a wall will do.

7. APPLE KICKS OFF BUSY WEEK


Advertisement

The tech giant is expected to show off some new additions to the current family of iPhone and iPad devices.

8. 'YOU'VE WON ... A COLLEGE EDUCATION'

In hopes of wooing students in an era of tight competition, colleges start to deliver small batches of acceptance letters in the style of a surprise television sweepstakes.

9. WHY BEN AFFLECK TAKES BATMAN ROLE SERIOUSLY

The actor is trying to win over fans skeptical of him playing the caped crusader in "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice" by putting a lot of physical effort into the role.

10. WHERE BASEBALL IS ALLOCATING ITS SALARIES

Major league teams have increased spending on younger players — led by Cuban prospects — but overall percentage of revenue going to players has been relatively stable for a decade.